1-20 of 722 Search Results for

molybdenum

Follow your search
Access your saved searches in your account

Would you like to receive an alert when new items match your search?
Close Modal
Sort by
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2022
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.tstap.t56040076
EISBN: 978-1-62708-428-4
... Abstract Molybdenum thermal spray coatings are used in aerospace and other industries for wear resistance applications. Metallographic sample preparation of molybdenum coatings presents unique challenges. The purpose of the investigation described in this article is to determine Accepted...
Image
Published: 01 January 2015
Fig. 2.17 The titanium-molybdenum system. Molybdenum, niobium, tantalum, vanadium, hafnium, and zirconium form a complete series of beta solid solutions with titanium; hafnium and zirconium also form a complete series of alpha solid solutions. More
Image
Published: 01 December 2001
Fig. 1 Elevated-temperature properties of molybdenum and molybdenum alloys. (a) Tensile strength. (b) Larson-Miller parameter (LMP) with temperature given in degrees Kelvin and the time to rupture, t r , given in hours. Source: Ref 1 More
Image
Published: 30 April 2020
Fig. 4.6 Two scanning electron micrographs of agglomerated small molybdenum particles. The spray dry agglomerates are nearly spherical. They are formed from a slurry of powder, solvent, backbone, and lubricant that is sprayed into a heated chamber, where the droplets form and the solvents More
Image
Published: 01 November 2007
Fig. 10.7 Influence of a molybdenum alloy addition on the dependence of hardness on tempering temperature. The incremental hardness increase caused by alloying is represented by ΔH. Source: Ref 10.3 More
Image
Published: 01 November 2007
Fig. 10.10 Secondary hardening peak appears with large additions of molybdenum to a 1035 steel. Source: Ref 10.3 More
Image
Published: 01 August 2013
Fig. 7.10 Secondary hardening in steels containing chromium and molybdenum. Source: Ref 7.2 More
Image
Published: 01 June 2016
Fig. 2.13 SEM micrograph of a titanium-molybdenum composite cold sprayed with nitrogen at a process gas pressure of 4.2 MPa (610 psi) and a process gas temperature of 930 °C (1700 °F). The volume content of 50% Mo in the powder blend was reduced to 41% in the final coating at an overall More
Image
Published: 30 November 2013
Fig. 2 Creep curves for a molybdenum-vanadium low-alloy steel under tension at four stress levels at 600 °C (1112 °F). Source: Ref 2 More
Image
Published: 01 December 2015
Fig. 6 Crack velocity as a function of stress intensity for a chromium-molybdenum-vanadium steel at 291 K (18 °C, or 64 °F). Source: Ref 17 More
Image
Published: 01 July 2009
Fig. 15.14 Binary phase diagram of beryllium-molybdenum. Source: Okamoto et al. 1987c More
Image
Published: 01 August 2005
Fig. 2.71 Effect of change of strain rate on tensile properties of carbon-molybdenum steel at 595 °C (1100 °F). Source: Ref 2.42 More
Image
Published: 01 December 2006
Fig. 9 Critical pitting temperature versus molybdenum content for commercial austenitic stainless steels tested in 10% FeCl 3 . Resistance to pitting, as measured by the critical pitting temperature, increases with molybdenum content and decreases after autogenous tungsten inert gas welding More
Image
Published: 01 March 2012
Fig. 13.13 Distribution of aluminum and molybdenum in the α and β phases for the same Ti-6242 alloy as in Fig. 13.12 . The lines were calculated from PanTi and experimental data. Source: Ref 13.7 and 13.10 as published in Ref 13.2 More
Image
Published: 01 November 2013
Fig. 17 Secondary hardening of molybdenum alloy steels. Source: Ref 9 More
Image
Published: 01 January 2015
Fig. 4.15 Effect of molybdenum on start of beta-to-alpha transformation. Increasing the molybdenum content in titanium-molybdenum alloys shifts the initial transformation of beta to alpha to the right. Hence, beta is more readily retained. More
Image
Published: 31 December 2020
Fig. 7 End-quench hardenability of molybdenum low-alloy steels. (a) 4027, (b) 4047, (c) 0.50 Mo, and (d) 2 Mo steels. Source: Ref 10 More
Image
Published: 01 November 2010
Fig. 5.5 Influence of molybdenum in the 982 °C/234 MPa (1800 °F/34,000 psi) (a) creep life and (b) creep rate of an experimental single-crystal superalloy. Source: Ref 23 More
Image
Published: 01 November 2010
Fig. 5.6 Influence of molybdenum content on γ′ solvus for a Ni-Cr-Al-Ti-Mo alloy. Source: Ref 27 More
Image
Published: 01 July 2000
Fig. 5.29 Anodic polarization curves for nickel-molybdenum alloys in 1 N H 2 SO 4 . Redrawn from Ref 26 More