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molten filler metal

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Book Chapter

Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 November 2011
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.jub.t53290165
EISBN: 978-1-62708-306-5
... Abstract Brazing and soldering processes use a molten filler metal to wet the mating surfaces of a joint, with or without the aid of a fluxing agent, leading to the formation of a metallurgical bond between the filler and the respective components. This chapter discusses the characteristics...
Book Chapter

Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 August 2005
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.pb.t51230001
EISBN: 978-1-62708-351-5
..., as adhesives do not have high temperature stability, they are never used in combination with brazes. 1.1.3 Brazing and Soldering Brazing and soldering use a molten filler metal to wet the mating surfaces of a joint, with or without the aid of a fluxing agent, leading to the formation of metallurgical...
Book Chapter

Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 April 2004
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.ps.t62440001
EISBN: 978-1-62708-352-2
... Soldering and Brazing Soldering and brazing involve using a molten filler metal to wet the mating surfaces of a joint, with or without the aid of a fluxing agent, leading to the formation of metallurgical bonds between the filler and the respective components. In these processes, the original surfaces...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 August 2005
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.pb.t51230143
EISBN: 978-1-62708-351-5
... by the molten braze is a common cause of poor joints. Inadequate wetting may be the result of restrictions applied to the choice of joining temperature and atmosphere, including the use of fluxes, which leave the joint surfaces insufficiently clean. Active filler metals can often help to overcome this problem...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 August 2005
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.pb.t51230221
EISBN: 978-1-62708-351-5
..., one or more of which is nonmetallic, in order to achieve assemblies with specific combinations of properties. As pointed out in earlier chapters, for a molten alloy to wet and spread over the joint surfaces, a degree of chemical interaction between the filler metal and the parent materials...
Image
Published: 01 August 2005
Fig. 3.10 Wetting mechanism of self-fluxing filler metals. (a) Self-fluxing filler applied to copper component. (b) Filler and its oxide melt and wet the oxide film on the component surface. (c) Oxide film on the component dissolves in the molten braze to form a slag that floats to the free More
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 August 2005
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.pb.t51230105
EISBN: 978-1-62708-351-5
... them in the process. These atmospheres may either decompose surface films (as does hydrogen when acting on certain oxide or sulfide layers, for example) or react with the films to produce compounds that can be displaced by the molten filler metal. An example of the latter is magnesium vapor...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 April 2004
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.ps.t62440145
EISBN: 978-1-62708-352-2
... for eliminating or suppressing these deleterious characteristics are described as follows. 4.1.1 Wetting of Metals by Solders Restrictions applied to the choice of joining temperature and atmosphere, including the use of fluxes, can result in poor wetting of the component surfaces by the molten filler...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 April 2013
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.imub.t53720411
EISBN: 978-1-62708-305-8
... with or without a sharp point. Pores can be uniformly distributed throughout the weld or isolated in small groups; they can also be concentrated at the root or toe of the weld. Porosity in welds is caused by gas entrapment in the molten metal by too much moisture on the base or filler metal, or by improper...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 July 2009
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.bcp.t52230401
EISBN: 978-1-62708-298-3
.... These conditions help to minimize the grain size in the weld metal and HAZ. When welding manually, the filler rod is added into the pool of molten metal ahead of the arc. Improper electrode and rod angles may degrade the weld. The recommended angles are 15┬░ backward and 75┬░ forward from the vertical to the work...
Book Chapter

Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 November 2011
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.jub.t53290023
EISBN: 978-1-62708-306-5
... the combustion and decomposition of the electrode covering. Additional shielding is provided for the molten metal in the weld pool by a covering of molten flux or slag. Filler metal is supplied by the core of the consumable electrode and from metal power mixed with the electrode coverings of certain electrodes...
Book Chapter

Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 August 2005
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.pb.t51230207
EISBN: 978-1-62708-351-5
... with regard to service temperature and metallurgical simplicity that is obtainable from diffusion bonding. This process uses a molten filler metal to initially fill the joint gap, but during the heating stage, the filler diffuses into the material of the components to form solid phases and, in consequence...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 August 2005
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.pb.t51230047
EISBN: 978-1-62708-351-5
... referred to as self-fluxing brazes. Fig. 2.1 Copper-phosphorus phase diagram A number of joining processes use thin copper metallizations and rely on the generation of a molten filler, at temperatures below the melting point of copper, through alloying with the parent metal. Electroplatings...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2006
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.cw.t51820169
EISBN: 978-1-62708-339-3
... be considered. When dissimilar metals are joined by arc (fusion) welding processes, alloying between the base metals and a filler metal; when used, becomes a major consideration. The resulting weld metal can behave much differently from one or both base metals during subsequent processing or in service...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 1995
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.sch6.t68200369
EISBN: 978-1-62708-354-6
... is added to the molten weld pool in a similar manner to oxy-fuel gas welding ( Figure 25-2 ). The advantage of the GTAW process is the availability of filler metal for stainless and high alloys. While many of the common alloys are available in bare wire form, variations in alloy content, or exotic alloys...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 April 2004
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.ps.t62440103
EISBN: 978-1-62708-352-2
.... These atmospheres may either decompose surface films (as does hydrogen when acting on certain oxide or sulfide layers, for example) or react with the films to produce compounds that can be displaced by the molten filler metal. Traditional rosin fluxes predominantly function in this manner. Controlled gas...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2015
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.cpi2.t55030096
EISBN: 978-1-62708-282-2
... the heat input to the weld and/or by flowing molten filler metal over the surface of the unmixed zone to form a barrier to the service environment. Care must be taken in this latter operation to avoid cold laps and lack-of-fusion defects. In both cases, preferential attack is avoided as long as the surface...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 April 2004
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.ps.t62440189
EISBN: 978-1-62708-352-2
... processes have been developed for applying the interconnect metal. One of the more interesting of these uses a jetting system to generate a stream of precisely sized molten droplets. These are steered by an electrostatic deflection system, and an exact number of droplets can be deposited at any location...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 July 1997
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.wip.t65930283
EISBN: 978-1-62708-359-1
... properties that affect welding, namely oxide characteristics; the solubility of hydrogen in molten aluminum; and its thermal, electrical, and nonmagnetic characteristics. The article addresses the primary factors commonly considered when selecting a welding filler alloy, namely ease of welding or freedom...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 March 2002
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.stg2.t61280149
EISBN: 978-1-62708-267-9
... these difficulties. Arc Processes An arc, struck between an electrode and the workpiece, is the most common method of heating for fusion welding. Heat generated by the arc melts the filler metal (sometimes the filler is the electrode, as in GMAW) and the base metals. A molten pool is produced, invariably...