1-20 of 54 Search Results for

molten bismuth

Follow your search
Access your saved searches in your account

Would you like to receive an alert when new items match your search?
Close Modal
Sort by
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 November 2007
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.htcma.t52080423
EISBN: 978-1-62708-304-1
... behavior of alloys in molten aluminum, zinc, lead, lithium, sodium, magnesium, mercury, cadmium, tin, antimony, and bismuth. It also discusses the problem of liquid metal embrittlement, explaining how it is caused by low-melting-point metals during brazing, welding, and heat treating operations...
Book Chapter

Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 November 2011
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.jub.t53290165
EISBN: 978-1-62708-306-5
... Abstract Brazing and soldering processes use a molten filler metal to wet the mating surfaces of a joint, with or without the aid of a fluxing agent, leading to the formation of a metallurgical bond between the filler and the respective components. This chapter discusses the characteristics...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 March 2012
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.pdub.t53420289
EISBN: 978-1-62708-310-2
... , and the alloy is completely liquid above temperature T 1 . If an alloy is to be cast, then the temperature of the molten alloy has to be higher than T 1 . In order to fill the mold completely before freezing blocks of any thin section, the alloy should be at least 50 °C (28 °F) higher than its liquidus...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 October 2011
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.mnm2.t53060315
EISBN: 978-1-62708-261-7
...-point metals (bismuth, indium, lead, tin, zinc) Reactive metals (hafnium, titanium, and zirconium) Precious metals (gold, silver, platinum, palladium, iridium, rhodium, ruthenium, and osmium) Rare earth metals Semimetals (also known as metalloids) As this list indicates, some...
Book Chapter

Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2008
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.emea.t52240583
EISBN: 978-1-62708-251-8
... temperature limits. It is resistant to molten bismuth, lithium, magnesium, potassium, and sodium but is attacked by molten tin, aluminum, iron, nickel, and cobalt. When heated in atmospheres containing oxygen above 425 °C (800 °F), molybdenum forms a volatile oxide (MoO 3 ) that evolves as a white, odorless...
Book Chapter

Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 November 2007
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.smnm.t52140117
EISBN: 978-1-62708-264-8
... are an ideal liquid bath for rapid quenching because of the very high thermal conductivity of liquid metals and the lack of vapor blanket formation. Molten lead does not react with steel, and it melts at 327 °C (620 °F). It can be alloyed with bismuth, which also does not react with steel, giving a eutectic...
Book Chapter

Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2001
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.aub.t61170100
EISBN: 978-1-62708-297-6
... the mottling tendency. Increases FSG and SSG Antimony Tramp element in cast scrap or steel. Vitreous enamel on bathtub scrap. Intentional addition <0.005 Slightly retards FSG and SSG Arsenic Tramp element in cast scrap or steel <0.011 No reported effects Bismuth Usually a ladle addition...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2001
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.aub.t61170528
EISBN: 978-1-62708-297-6
... melting, casting, and wetting properties, as in type metals and solders. Tin gives the alloy the ability to wet and bond with metals such as steel and copper; unalloyed lead has poor wetting characteristics. Tin combined with lead and bismuth or cadmium forms the principal ingredient of many low-melting...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2001
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.aub.t61170351
EISBN: 978-1-62708-297-6
... in sheared lengths for foundry use. The same grain-refining compositions are furnished in waffle form. In addition to grain-refining master alloys, salts (usually in compacted form) that react with molten aluminum to form combinations of TiAl 3 and TiB 2 are also available. Despite the successful use...
Book Chapter

Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 March 2002
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.stg2.t61280041
EISBN: 978-1-62708-267-9
... Increasing heat extraction or decreasing heat input (rate of molten metal introduction to the ingot) increases both G and R . This decreases LST, and, as is intuitively obvious, increasing heat extraction or decreasing heat input thus decreases dendrite size. When the solidification conditions become...
Book Chapter

Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 March 2002
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.stg2.t61280203
EISBN: 978-1-62708-267-9
... or subjected to service at elevated temperatures. The high-temperature strength and ductility of nickel-base precipitation-hardened superalloys are severely reduced by minute quantities of lead, bismuth, antimony, selenium, and arsenic. As noted previously, small amounts of aluminum, even though...
Book Chapter

Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2000
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.ttg2.t61120307
EISBN: 978-1-62708-269-3
... Saturated Room Nil Bismuth Molten 816 (1500) High Bismuth/lead Molten 300 (572) Good resistance Boric acid Saturated Room Nil 10 Boiling Nil Bromine Liquid 30 (86) Rapid attack Bromine, moist Vapor 30 (86) <0.003 Bromine gas, dry ... 21 (70) Dissolves rapidly...
Book Chapter

Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2001
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.aub.t61170107
EISBN: 978-1-62708-297-6
... about 0.7% in martensitic white irons. When the manganese content exceeds about 1.3%, the strength and toughness of martensitic irons begin to drop. Abrasion resistance also drops, mainly because of austenite retention. Molten iron with a high manganese content tends to attack furnace and ladle...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2001
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.aub.t61170457
EISBN: 978-1-62708-297-6
.... Lead, tellurium, sulfur, bismuth, and selenium are added to copper base metals to improve machinability. Free-cutting alloys containing such additions yield small, fragmented chips, making them well suited for highspeed machining operations (i.e., screw machine production). Copper...
Book Chapter

Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2001
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.aub.t61170021
EISBN: 978-1-62708-297-6
... added, the amount of iron being alloyed (the entire charge or only portions of the charge), and the ladling practice in the specific foundry. In cupola melting, nickel, copper, chromium, and molybdenum are added to the molten metal during or after tapping, rather than being added to the cupola...
Book Chapter

Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2001
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.aub.t61170003
EISBN: 978-1-62708-297-6
... substitute for base metal atoms in the crystal lattice, but some distortion of the lattice will also result. In either case, the distortion caused by the solid solution will result in making slip more difficult (solid-solution hardening) ( Fig. 3b ). When a metal solidifies from the molten state...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2008
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.emea.t52240597
EISBN: 978-1-62708-251-8
... mineral and organic acids, strong alkalis, saline solutions, and some molten salts. Zirconium is not attacked by oxidizing media unless halides are present. Like titanium, it is susceptible to the formation of embrittling hydrides when exposed to hydrogen at elevated temperatures. Hafnium, like...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2004
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.aacppa.9781627083355
EISBN: 978-1-62708-335-5
Book Chapter

Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 October 2011
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.mnm2.t53060247
EISBN: 978-1-62708-261-7
... the eutectic point occurs at a composition of 4.26% C and a temperature of 1148 °C. Eutectic solidification can begin at a composition of 2.08 % C, which is the point where the maximum solubility of carbon in austenite is achieved. If molten iron has more than 2.08 % C, then the melt does not solidify...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 March 2012
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.pdub.t53420001
EISBN: 978-1-62708-310-2
... is completed on cooling. Above the liquidus every alloy is molten, and this region of the diagram is, accordingly, labeled L for the liquid phase or liquid solution. Below the solidus all alloys are solid, and this region is labeled α because it is customary to use a Greek letter for the designation...