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microstructural evolution

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Published: 01 August 2018
Fig. 13.14 (Part 1) Microstructural evolution of a dual phase steel hot rolled, cold worked, and subjected to austenitization inside the critical zone for the times and temperatures indicated in (a), (b), and (c). Etchant: LePera. Martensite: light; ferrite: gray; pearlite: dark. (d), (e More
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Published: 01 August 2018
Fig. 13.14 (Part 2) Microstructural evolution of a dual phase steel hot rolled, cold worked, and subjected to austenitization inside the critical zone for the times and temperatures indicated in (a), (b), and (c). Etchant: LePera. Martensite: light; ferrite: gray; pearlite: dark. (d), (e More
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Published: 01 August 2018
Fig. 16.22 Microstructural evolution of a weld metal containing Cr = 19% and Ni = 11% during solidification. Solidification was performed by quenching in liquid tin. Left of the image: the steel that was liquid when quenched. The dendrites grow as ferrite (δ) from the liquid. Later, austenite More
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Published: 01 August 2018
Fig. 17.22 Schematic microstructural evolution of a gray cast iron during solidification superimposed on a thermal analysis curve. Some undercooling below the eutectic temperature is needed for nucleation to start. Eutectic solidification happens essentially at constant temperature More
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Published: 01 December 2018
Fig. 6.26 Microstructural evolution during high-temperature creep damage: (a) initial ferrite plus pearlite, (b) in situ spheroidized carbide, (c) grain boundary carbides, (d) creep voids More
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Published: 30 June 2023
Fig. 6.9 Microstructural evolution during processing of an Al-Mg-Mn 3 xxx alloy (AlMg1Mn1). Source: Ref 6.9 . Courtesy of Jürgen Hirsch, Hydro Aluminium Rolled Products Research and Development, Bonn More
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Published: 01 August 2018
Fig. 11.41 Schematic presentation of the microstructure evolution during hot working (hot rolling in the example). Two possibilities are illustrated; when the recrystallization starts while the material is still suffering hot working, it is called dynamic recrystallization. Static More
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Published: 01 December 2016
Fig. 1.6 Schematic presentation of the microstructure evolution during transitions. (a) Plane to cellular (P-C), cellular to dendrite (C-D), dendrite to equiaxed grains (D-E). Source: Ref 14 . (b) Solidification front morphology as affected by the temperature-concentration field. P, plane; K More
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Published: 31 December 2020
Fig. 3 Microstructure evolution during annealing of cold-worked (rolled) Al-Mg alloy (5005, Al-Mg1) and effect on room temperature tensile yield strength (red curve) and elongation (blue curve) with cold work H2 x tempers indicated. Source: Ref 4 More
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Published: 31 January 2024
Fig. 11 Microstructure evolution for a 1 wt% silicon alloy More
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 30 April 2020
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.bpapp.t59290169
EISBN: 978-1-62708-319-5
... on the events that are contributing to sintering densification, followed by a discussion on the driving forces, such as surface energy, and high-temperature atomic motion as well as the factors affecting these processes. The process of microstructure evolution in sintering is then described, followed...
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Published: 01 August 2018
Fig. 12.16 (Part 1) The evolution of the microstructure of an extra low carbon steel (C = 0.011%, Mn = 0.193%) cold worked (90% reduction), annealed at different temperatures: (a) 540 °C (1000 °F), (b) 560 °C (1040 °F), (c) 580 °C (1075 °F), (d) 600 °C (1110 °F). (Remark: the α–γ More
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Published: 01 August 2018
Fig. 12.16 (Part 2) The evolution of the microstructure of an extra low carbon steel (C = 0.011%, Mn = 0.193%) cold worked (90% reduction), annealed at different temperatures: (e) 680 °C (1255 °F), (f) 720 °C (1330 °F), (g) 760 °C (1400 °F). (h) The evolution of the ferritic grain size More
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Published: 01 August 2018
Fig. 15.9 The evolution of the microstructure of AISI 52100 steel as a function of the isothermal holding time, in accordance with the austempering cycles presented in Fig. 15.6(a) . Lower bainite is present as dark needles; the cementite that did not dissolve during austenitization shows More
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Published: 01 March 2002
Fig. 3.5 Qualitative description of the evolution of microstructure and the change in chromium content for nickel-base superalloys More
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Published: 01 November 2010
Fig. 4.1 Evolution of microstructure and chromium content of selected nickel-base superalloys. Desirable phases are highlighted in the microstructure. Source: Ref 3 More
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Published: 01 December 2001
Fig. 4 Qualitative description of the evolution of microstructure and chromium content of nickel-base superalloys More
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Published: 01 August 2012
Fig. 7.18 Interactions between the mechanical field, thermal field, and microstructure evolution. Source: Ref 7.17 More
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Published: 01 August 2018
Fig. 17.10 Iron-carbon metastable equilibrium phase diagram. L: liquid; gamma, γ: austenite. The microstructural evolution of three types of white cast iron is presented in a simplified way on this diagram: hypoeutectic cast iron (3% C), eutectic cast iron (4.3% C), and hypereutectic cast iron More
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Published: 01 August 2018
Fig. 14.26 The steel shown in Fig. 14.25 after creep testing at 600 °C (1110 °F) and 118 MPa (17 ksi). Time to rupture was 2179 h. It is possible to follow the microstructure evolution with time, during use under these conditions: recovery, in particular close to the prior austenitic grain More