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methane

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Published: 01 March 2012
Fig. A.5 Covalent bonding in methane. Source: Ref A.1 More
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Published: 01 December 2003
Fig. 18(a) Chemical groups in the naming of polymers. Acetate group to methane More
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Published: 01 June 2008
Fig. 1.5 Covalent bonding in methane More
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Published: 01 October 2011
Fig. 2.6 Covalent bonding in methane More
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Published: 31 August 2023
Fig. 10 Methane molecule with each atom ID shown More
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Published: 31 August 2023
Fig. 11 Potential energy of a methane molecule as a function of the H 3 C-H bond distance More
Book Chapter

Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 November 2007
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.htcma.t52080437
EISBN: 978-1-62708-304-1
..., hydrogen atoms can be absorbed at the surface and then diffuse into the metal. Hydrogen atoms in the metal then react with iron carbide forming methane gas which can accumulate at grain boundaries and other interfaces. The chapter describes two applications, one in coal-fired boilers, the other...
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Published: 01 December 2003
Fig. 5 The metallographic appearance of AISI 1015 (UNS G10150) steel after a 2 h vacuum nitrocarburizing treatment in an ammonia/methane mixture with 1% oxygen addition More
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Published: 01 September 2005
Fig. 2 End-quench hardenability curve for 1020 steel carbonitrided at 900 °C (1650 °F) compared with curve for the same steel carburized at 925 °C (1700 °F). Hardness was measured along the surface of the as-quenched hardenability specimen. Ammonia and methane contents of the inlet More
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Published: 30 November 2013
Fig. 12 Hydrogen-damaged refinery platformer line (carbon steel, 0.5% Mo). (a) Undamaged microstructure. (b) Decarburization region caused by hydrogen depleting the iron carbides. (c) Microfissuring at inclusions. (d) Hydrogen blister caused by methane gas formation. (a) and (b), nital etch More
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2003
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.pnfn.t65900111
EISBN: 978-1-62708-350-8
... ). Grateful acknowledgment is given to Ray Reynoldson of Quality Heat Treatment Pty Ltd., Turbo Drive, North Bayswater 3153, Australia, for his valued assistance with this chapter. Acknowledgment Nitrogen Methane Endothermic gas Ammonia Gas mixtures such as methane and nitrogen or ammonia...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2008
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.emea.t52240395
EISBN: 978-1-62708-251-8
... of the carburizing temperature and time, type of cycle, carbon potential of the furnace atmosphere, and the original composition of the steel. The source of carbon is a carbon-rich furnace atmosphere produced either from gaseous hydrocarbons, such as methane (CH 4 ), propane (C 3 H 3 ), and butane (C 4 H 10...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 1989
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.dmlahtc.t60490329
EISBN: 978-1-62708-340-9
.... , Revision to the Nelson Curves , Proc. Amer. Petroleum Inst. , Vol 36 , 1977 , p 3 - 6 71. Bailey N. , Bulletin No. 18, Welding Research Institute , 1977 , p 2 - 33 72. Merrick R.D. and McGuire C.J. , “ Methane Blistering of Equipment in High Temperature Hydrogen Service...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 30 November 2013
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.uhcf3.t53630237
EISBN: 978-1-62708-270-9
... that are exposed to elevated temperatures and high-pressure hydrogen. The result can be sudden and catastrophic brittle failure. Atomic hydrogen permeates the steel and reduces iron carbide (Fe 3 C) to form methane (CH 4 ). The methane does not diffuse from the metal, and its pressure may exceed the cohesive...
Book Chapter

Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 1999
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.cmp.t66770037
EISBN: 978-1-62708-337-9
... they are carburizing. There seems to be some disagreement regarding the third reaction (involving methane) and whether it is able to proceed in both directions as reported in Ref 1 . It has been reported as being able to proceed in one direction only ( Ref 2 ). If the latter is the case, then any hydrogen released...
Book Chapter

Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2003
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.pnfn.t65900071
EISBN: 978-1-62708-350-8
... cleaning (known as sputter cleaning) before the nitriding sequence. Methane can also be used to deliver controlled amounts of carbon to influence control of the ε-phase in the compound zone. Once again, care should be exercised in using methane; too much carbon can actively promote a dominant ε compound...
Book Chapter

Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 November 2013
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.mfub.t53740271
EISBN: 978-1-62708-308-9
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2018
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.fibtca.t52430204
EISBN: 978-1-62708-253-2
... diffuse into the steel and react with cementite, Fe 3 C, to form methane per the following reaction ( Ref 6.12 ): 4 H + Fe 3 C = 3 Fe + CH 4 The methane molecule, in view of its larger size, is unable to effuse out of the steel. Instead, it accumulates and is trapped...
Book Chapter

Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2008
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.emea.t52240003
EISBN: 978-1-62708-251-8
... transfer, as in the ionic bond. Instead, the valence electrons are shared between the two elements. For example, a molecule of methane (CH 4 ), shown in Fig. 1.5 , is held together by covalent bonds. Note that hydrogen, in group I on the periodic table, and carbon, in group IV, are much closer together...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 November 2007
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.smnm.t52140189
EISBN: 978-1-62708-264-8
... is called a plasma or a glow discharge. A problem with trying to carburize steels using only natural gas (methane, CH 4 ) is that the rate of step 1 of the carburizing process is much lower than that obtained with endo gas. However, the step 1 rate for pure methane can be increased dramatically by either...