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metallographic sectioning

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Published: 01 January 2017
Fig. 18.7 Metallographic section through a SCC fractured aluminum bolthead cap showing “leaves” along the fracture surface. The primary and secondary cracks are intergranular. Keller’s reagent. Original magnification: 100×. Source: Ref 18.11 More
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Published: 01 September 2008
Fig. 33 Metallographic section through the vertical crack showing (from right to left) a lightly etching region of fine-grained untempered martensite, a transition region of overtempered martensite, and a region of nominally tempered martensite. Hardness in the untempered martensite was KHN More
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Published: 01 July 2009
Fig. 5.25 Comparison of metallographic sections from specimens of type 316 stainless steel fatigued to failure in CP tests with varying exposure times. (a) High creep-rate test at 815 °C (1500 °F). (b) Low creep-rate test at 815 °C. (c) High creep-rate test at 705 °C (1300 °F). (d) Low creep More
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2016
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.ascaam.t59190147
EISBN: 978-1-62708-296-9
... in chemical composition. cast aluminum-silicon alloys etching intermetallic phase microstructure phase constituents 4.1 Visual Attributes of the Intermetallic Phase Precipitates in Aluminum Alloy Microstructure MICROSCOPIC OBSERVATION of metallographic cross sections allows...
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Published: 01 January 2017
Fig. 18.24 Stress-corrosion cracking failure of a cast aluminum pressure-switch housing. (a) Failed assemble. (b) Unetched metallographic section along the fracture interface, revealing extensive intergranular separation. Original magnification: 50×. (c) Etched metallographic section More
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Published: 01 January 2017
Fig. 18.21 Stress-corrosion cracking in cold-formed brass fuse caps. (a) Numerous longitudinal cracks are visible in the brass caps. (b) Unetched metallographic section showing the primary crack opening with limited branching. Original magnification: 50×. (c) Etched metallographic section More
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Published: 01 January 2017
Fig. 18.9 Stress-corrosion cracking failure of a batch reactor vessel. (a) Cross-sectional view of jacketed reactor. (b) Metallographic section through two NaOH-enriched pits. 2% nital etch. Original magnification: 50×. (c) Intergranular cracking initiated from pit penetrations. 2% nital etch More
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Published: 01 September 2008
Fig. 35 Fracture surface of the failed axle. (a) Black arrows show locations for SEM examination. (b) White arrows show fracture direction and location of metallographic sections. More
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Published: 01 August 2018
Fig. 17.20 Ledeburite. Depending on the growth direction of ledeburite and on the orientation of the plane of the metallographic section, different morphological aspects of the austenite (already transformed to pearlite) distribution in the cementite matrix can be observed. (Compare More
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Published: 01 September 2008
Fig. 1 A large roll was found to have cracks on the outer and inner surfaces of the forging. These cracks were found during final inspection. During examination of metallographic sections taken from the roll, high-temperature oxides were found on the crack faces, strongly suggesting forging More
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Published: 01 December 2006
Fig. 3 Metallographic cross section showing preferential fusion zone attack in alloy B-2 (UNS N10665). Sample was a welded coupon placed in a chemical plant process stream for approximately 1 year. Hydrochloric and chromic acid etch. 75× More
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Published: 01 December 2006
Fig. 4 Metallographic cross sections of the corroded surface of weld deposits on alloy B-2 (UNS N10665) after testing in an autoclave at 150 °C (300 °F) for 96 h in a 20% HCl environment. (a) Ni-28Mo (UNS N10665) alloy filler metal. 375× (b) Ni-42Mo filler metal. 375×. Both samples were etched More
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Published: 01 August 2005
Fig. 1.27 Metallographic cross section of a stainless steel strip clad on both sides with copper braze. In this case, the ratio of braze cladding to core material is in the ratio 5/90/5. More
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Published: 01 August 2005
Fig. 3.18 Metallographic cross section through an aluminum heat exchanger fabricated using a foil preform in an entirely fluxless process. By using a low-melting-point braze, the mechanical properties of the heat exchanger face plate material are not degraded and there is negligible erosion More
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Published: 01 August 2005
Fig. 4.1 Metallographic cross section through a 100 μm (4 mils) tri-foil braze preform. It consists of thin foils of a copper-nickel alloy applied by roll cladding to a core of aluminum-silicon alloy. The ratio of the thickness of the foils is adjusted to provide the correct aggregate More
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Published: 01 August 2005
Fig. 5.14 Metallographic cross section of a T-joint made to 22 carat gold jewelry using a true gold solder (i.e., melting point <450 °C, or 840 °F) More
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Published: 01 July 1997
Fig. 4 Typical sections used in the metallographic examination of welded joints More
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Published: 01 July 1997
Fig. 4 Metallographic cross sections of the corroded surface of weld deposits on Hastelloy B-2 (UNS N10665) after testing in an autoclave at 150 °C (300 °F) for 96 h in a 20% HCI environment. (a) Ni-28Mo (UNS N10665) alloy filler metal. 375x. (b) Ni-42Mo filler metal. 375x. Both samples were More
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 September 2008
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.fahtsc.t51130043
EISBN: 978-1-62708-284-6
... cracks on the outer and inner surfaces of the forging. These cracks were found during final inspection. During examination of metallographic sections taken from the roll, high-temperature oxides were found on the crack faces, strongly suggesting forging laps. Manufacture and Processing...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 March 2002
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.mgppis.t60400169
EISBN: 978-1-62708-258-7
... Abstract This chapter instructs the metallographer on the basic skills required to prepare a polished metallographic specimen. It is organized in a chronological sequence starting with the information-gathering process on the material being investigated, then moving on to sectioning, mounting...