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melting furnaces

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Published: 01 December 2006
Fig. 6.82 Design of copper alloy melting furnaces More
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Published: 01 June 1988
Fig. 6.21 Selection of power-supply frequency for coreless induction melting furnaces as a function of furnace size. A = recommended frequency regime. B = acceptable frequency. C = furnace frequencies which have been used but which do not provide good results. D = unusable furnace frequencies More
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Published: 01 May 2018
FIG. 6.2 Crucible melting furnace, circa 1829. This is the oldest example of the Benjamin Huntsman process. More
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Published: 01 December 2006
Fig. 6.66 Modern hearth melting furnace. Source: Gautschi, Tägerwillen, Switzerland More
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Published: 01 June 1988
Fig. 6.19 Schematic illustration of a coreless induction melting furnace More
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Published: 01 June 1988
Fig. 6.20 Typical channel induction melting furnace Source: Inductotherm More
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Published: 01 November 2013
Fig. 6 Basic elements of a vacuum induction melting furnace. Source: Ref 5 More
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Published: 01 June 1988
Fig. 11.26 Two views of a small vacuum induction melting furnace Source: Vacuum Industries, Inc. More
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Published: 01 January 2015
Fig. 8.9 Consumable electrode titanium vacuum arc melting furnace with centrifugal casting table. Courtesy of Howmet More
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 November 2013
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.mfub.t53740001
EISBN: 978-1-62708-308-9
... Abstract This chapter discusses the processes, procedures, and equipment used in the production of iron, steel, aluminum, and titanium alloys. It describes the design and operation of melting and refining furnaces, including blast furnaces, basic oxygen and electric arc furnaces, vacuum...
Book Chapter

Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 1995
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.sch6.t68200187
EISBN: 978-1-62708-354-6
... Abstract This chapter provides an overview of the types of melting furnaces and refractories for steel casting. It then presents information about arc furnace melting and induction melting cycles. The chapter also describes methods for the removal of phosphorous, the removal of sulfur...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 October 2011
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.mnm2.t53060085
EISBN: 978-1-62708-261-7
... the design and operation of melting furnaces as well as melting practices and the role of fluxing. It also discusses casting methods, nonferrous casting alloys, and atomization processes used to make metal powders. atomization foundry casting melting furnaces nonferrous casting alloys...
Book Chapter

Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 1988
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.eihdca.t65220001
EISBN: 978-1-62708-341-6
.... Initially, this was done using metal or electrically conducting crucibles. Later, Ferranti, Colby, and Kjellin developed induction melting furnaces which made use of nonconducting crucibles. In these designs, electric currents were induced directly into the charge, usually at simple line frequency, or 60 Hz...
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Published: 01 December 2018
Fig. 4.8 Melt treatment system with a dosing furnace More
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Published: 01 June 1988
Fig. 6.22 Relationship among furnace capacity, melting time, and power requirements for coreless induction melting of irons and steels Source: Radyne, Inc. More
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Published: 01 June 1988
Fig. 6.23 Power consumption quoted by furnace manufacturers for melting of cast iron in line-frequency induction furnaces of various capacities. From W. A. Parsons and J. Powell, Proc. Conf. on Electric Melting and Holding Furnaces in Iron Foundries , University of Warwick, March, 1980, p 18 More
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Published: 01 December 2000
Fig. 6.3 VAR furnace for melting titanium and centrifugal table for casting molten metal into the mold More
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Published: 01 November 2007
Fig. 7.2 Alloy 800H recuperator suffering severe sulfidation attack in a nonferrous metal scrap melting furnace. The 9.5 mm (0.4 in) thick recuperator was perforated in less than 2 years at metal temperatures of about 650 to 760 °C (1200 to 1400 °F). (a) General view of a corroded sample. (b More
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 1988
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.eihdca.t65220085
EISBN: 978-1-62708-341-6
... temperature, and so forth. The major applications of induction technology include through heating, surface heating (for surface heat treatment), metal melting, welding, brazing, and soldering. This chapter summarizes the selection of equipment and related design considerations for these applications...
Book Chapter

Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 November 2013
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.mfub.t53740047
EISBN: 978-1-62708-308-9
.... Casting production begins with melting of the metal (left side of Fig. 1 ). Molten metal is then tapped from the melting furnace into a ladle for pouring into the mold cavity, where it is allowed to solidify within the space defined by the sand mold and cores. After it has solidified, the casting...