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martensitic transformation

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Published: 01 January 2015
Fig. 5.5 Progress of athermal martensitic transformation in an Fe-1.8C alloy after cooling to: (a) 24 °C (75 °F); (b) −60 °C (−76 °F); and (c) −100 °C (−148 °F). Nital etch, original magnification 500×. Source: Ref 5.9 More
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Published: 01 January 2015
Fig. 5.6 Progress of athermal martensitic transformation in an Fe-1.94 Mo alloy. Successive exposures taken of surface relief on a hot stage microscope, original magnification 105×. Source: Ref 5.9 More
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Published: 01 August 2018
Fig. 9.10 Start temperatures for the martensitic transformation in Fe-C alloys, superimposed on the equilibrium phase diagram for this system. The range in which each of the martensite morphologies is predominant is indicated. Source: Adapted from Ref 15 More
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Published: 01 September 2008
Fig. 14 Temperature distribution and martensitic transformation during quenching of carburized 12.5 mm diameter steel bar. The curves (isochronal lines) in the figure indicate time in seconds after immersion of the carburized (0.9 mm case) bar into the quenchant indicated. More
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Published: 01 June 1983
Figure 5.13 The effect of martensitic transformation of the resistivity of β -brass ( Hummel, Koger, and Pasupathi, 1968 ). More
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Published: 01 June 1983
Figure 9.2 Three types of martensitic transformation kinetics on cooling. Type I is “athermal,” Type II is “burst,” and Type III is isothermal martensitic transformation. In (c), the curves show the effects of progressively decreasing cooling rates, from a to e. More
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Published: 01 June 1983
Figure 9.3 (a) Shape deformation of martensitic transformation in austenitic stainless steel (Fe–Cr–Ni alloy, AISI 304L) on cooling to 76 K. (b) Shape deformation of martensitic transformation in steel (AISI 304) flange previously used in service at 76 K. More
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 1983
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.mlt.t62860295
EISBN: 978-1-62708-348-5
... Abstract This chapter concentrates on very low-temperature martensitic transformations, which are of great concern for cryogenic applications and research. The principal transformation characteristics are reviewed and then elaborated. The material classes or alloy systems that exhibit...
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Published: 01 September 2008
Fig. 19 (a) Influence of austenitizing temperature on martensite transformation of a tool steel containing 1.1% C and 2.8% Cr. Higher austenitizing temperatures lower M s temperatures and increase the amount of austenite retained at room temperature. Source: Ref 15 . (b) Amounts More
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Published: 01 March 2002
Fig. 2.54 Plate martensite transformation in the primary austenite dendrites of an alloy (Ni-Hard) white cast iron (2.95% C, 0.63% Mn, 0.73% Si, 3.08% Ni, and 2.17% Cr). 4% picral etch. 500× More
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Published: 01 November 2007
Fig. 4.17 Both martensite transformation temperatures, M s and M f , fall rapidly as wt%C in austenite increases More
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Published: 01 December 2000
Fig. 9.7 Micrographs showing martensitically transformed solute bands (small arrows) in dissimilar alloy gas-tungsten arc welding between Ti-6Al-4V and Ti-15V-3Cr-3Al-3Sn sheets. (a) Visible light microscope; large arrow indicates fusion line. (b) Scanning electron microscope More
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Published: 01 December 2000
Fig. 2.8 Influence of carbon on the start of the martensite transformation of high-purity iron-carbon alloys More
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Published: 01 January 1998
Fig. 5-11 Influence of austenitizing temperature on the martensite transformation kinetics of a tool steel containing 1.1% C and 2.8% Cr. Higher austenitizing temperatures lower M s temperatures and increase the amount of austenite retained at room temperature. Source: Ref 22 More
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Published: 01 January 1998
Fig. 5-33 Martensite transformation diagram for a low-alloy tool steel More
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Published: 01 January 1998
Fig. 5-34 Retardation of martensite transformation as a function of holding time at 60 °C (140 °F) in a 1.1 C-0.2Si-0.3Mn steel. Source: Ref 53 More
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2008
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.emea.t52240053
EISBN: 978-1-62708-251-8
... of free energy that governs whether or not a phase transformation is possible, and then the kinetic considerations that determine the rate at which transformations take place. The chapter also describes important solid-state transformations such as spinodal decomposition and martensitic transformation...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1998
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.ts5.t65900067
EISBN: 978-1-62708-358-4
... to the kinetics and stabilization of martensite transformation are also covered. It briefly reviews selected aspects of the changes that evolve during tempering. austenite transformation hardenability hardness heat treatment high-carbon steel Jominy curves martensite transformation microstructure...
Book Chapter

Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 August 2015
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.piht2.t55050139
EISBN: 978-1-62708-311-9
... to verify whether a quenchant can cool a workpiece fast enough to achieve martensitic transformation without cracking or distortion. induction heat treating quenchants quenching WHEN INDUCTION HARDENING, the workpieces are cooled by surrounding, spraying, or immersing the part in a quenchant...
Book Chapter

Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2015
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.spsp2.t54410063
EISBN: 978-1-62708-265-5
... The formation of martensite is characterized by its athermal transformation kinetics, crystallographic features, and development of fine structure. This chapter describes the diffusionless, shear-type transformation of austenite to martensite and how it affects the morphology and microstructure...