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Book Chapter

Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2015
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.spsp2.t54410063
EISBN: 978-1-62708-265-5
... The formation of martensite is characterized by its athermal transformation kinetics, crystallographic features, and development of fine structure. This chapter describes the diffusionless, shear-type transformation of austenite to martensite and how it affects the morphology and microstructure...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 August 1999
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.lmcs.t66560283
EISBN: 978-1-62708-291-4
...Abstract Abstract This chapter describes the effects that can be observed by light microscopy when a steel in the hardened condition, consisting of martensite and possibly some retained austenite, is heated at subcritical temperatures. It includes micrographs that illustrate the effect...
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Published: 01 September 2008
Fig. 11 Martensite morphology. (a) Lath martensite. (b) Plate martensite. Source: Ref 30 More
Book Chapter

Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 August 2013
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.ahsssta.t53700127
EISBN: 978-1-62708-279-2
...Abstract Abstract Martensitic steels are produced by quenching carbon steel from the austenite phase into martensite. This chapter provides information on the composition, microstructures, processing, deformation mechanisms, mechanical properties, hot forming, tempering, and special attributes...
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Published: 01 August 2018
Fig. 13.10 Detail from Fig. 13.9 . Ferrite (light) and martensite. The martensite areas are easier to observe. In this case, in the optical microscope retained austenite cannot be identified. Etchant: nital 3%. Courtesy of C. S. Viana, EEIMVR-UFF, Volta Redonda, RJ, Brazil. Source: Ref 5 More
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Published: 01 November 2012
Fig. 10 Fracture toughness and martensite twin density as a function of martensite start temperature for an Fe-Cr-C steel. Source: Ref 1 More
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Published: 31 December 2020
Fig. 28 Light micrographs of morphologies of martensite. (a) Lath martensite in low-carbon steel (0.03C-2.0Mn, wt%) at original magnification: 100×. (b) Plate martensite in matrix of retained austenite in a high-carbon (1.2 wt% C) steel at 1000×. (c) Mixed morphology of lath martensite with some More
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Published: 01 October 2011
Fig. 9.13 Morphology of (a) lath martensite and (b) plate martensite More
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Published: 01 October 2011
Fig. 14.12 Martensite (β′) in aluminum bronze. (a) Martensite needles in Cu-11.8Al alloy homogenized at 800 °C and water quenched. (b) Martensite running from bottom right to top left. Cu-11.8Al alloy is heated to 900 °C (1650 °F), held 1 h, then water quenched. Source: Ref 14.6 More
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Published: 01 May 2018
FIG. 4.5 Martensite microstructure. The transformation of austenite to martensite was not understood until much additional research was performed. More
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Published: 01 January 2015
Fig. 17.25 Change in martensite lath boundary area per unit volume in martensite of an Fe-0.20% C alloy tempered at 400 °C (750 °F) for various times. Source: Ref 17.40 More
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Published: 01 December 1996
Fig. 2-11 Examples of the microstructure of martensite. (a) Lath martensite in a low-carbon alloy steel (0.03% C, 2% Mn); (b) Plate martensite (marked P) and lath martensite in medium-carbon (0.57% C) steel; (c) Plate martensite in a high-carbon (1.2% C) steel. Matrix is retained austenite More
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2008
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.ssde.t52310123
EISBN: 978-1-62708-286-0
...Abstract Abstract This chapter discusses the metallurgy, phase structure, thermal processing, and applications of martensitic stainless steels. The phenomenon of martensite formation is explained. A table listing the compositions of martensitic stainless steels is also presented...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 1983
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.mlt.t62860295
EISBN: 978-1-62708-348-5
...Abstract Abstract This chapter concentrates on very low-temperature martensitic transformations, which are of great concern for cryogenic applications and research. The principal transformation characteristics are reviewed and then elaborated. The material classes or alloy systems that exhibit...
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Published: 01 December 2018
Fig. 3.13 Transformation of fcc austenite to bct martensite, known as the bain model More
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Published: 01 December 2018
Fig. 6.14 Tempered martensite, (a) at unaffected location, 400×; and (b) at fracture edge with scattered fissures in the matrix. The fracture edge is covered with a scale, 200×. More
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Published: 01 December 2018
Fig. 6.37 Core microstructure of a tube showing ferrite and tempered martensite, (a) 400×, (b) 1000× More
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Published: 01 December 2018
Fig. 6.172 (a) Parent metal microstructure of tempered martensite, 200×; microstructures (b) 400× and (c) 200× are of the outer edge and HAZ consisting of martensite with acicular needles More
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Published: 01 August 2018
Fig. 9.9 (a) Martensite lattice parameters as a function of carbon content. (b) The hardness of martensite as a function of the carbon content. In the gray region, untransformed (retained) austenite may be present. The upper limit of the region corresponds to the real hardness of martensitic More
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Published: 01 August 2018
Fig. 9.13 A schematic representation illustrating how it is possible for martensite (α′) to maintain macroscopic coherency with the surrounding austenite (γ). For this to happen, martensite must form with well-defined crystallography in relation to the parent austenite, as discussed, for instance More