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Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2001
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.aub.t61170242
EISBN: 978-1-62708-297-6
... Abstract This article provides an overview of austenitic manganese steels. It describes the standard composition ranges of commercial products and explains how various alloying elements affect mechanical properties, processing, and performance. The article also discusses special grades...
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Published: 31 January 2024
Fig. A15 Microstructure development for an 85 wt% manganese and copper-manganese alloy More
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Published: 31 January 2024
Fig. A36 Microstructure development of an 88 wt% manganese and copper-manganese alloy More
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Published: 31 January 2024
Fig. A40 Microstructure development of a 10 wt% manganese and iron-manganese alloy More
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Published: 01 August 2018
Fig. 8.75 (a) Manganese and sulfur and (b) manganese and phosphorus characteristic x-ray mapping in longitudinal section of samples subjected to controlled cooling and quenched. Lighter regions indicate higher concentration of these elements and the formation of manganese sulfide More
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Published: 01 December 2001
Fig. 19 Interactive effect of carbon and manganese on notch toughness. Manganese-to-carbon ratio affects the transition temperature of ferritic steels. More
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Published: 01 December 2001
Fig. 5 Variation of properties with manganese content for austenitic manganese steel containing 1.15% C. Data are for castings weighing 3.6 to 4.5 kg (8 to 10 lb) and about 25 mm (1 in.) in section size that were water quenched from 1040 to 1095 °C (1900 to 2000 °F). Flow under impact More
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Published: 01 December 1995
Fig. 23-15 Interactive effect of carbon and manganese on notch toughness. Manganese-to-carbon ratio affects the transition temperature of ferritic steels ( 6 ). More
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Published: 31 January 2024
Fig. A14 Copper-manganese phase diagram More
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Published: 31 January 2024
Fig. A35 Copper-manganese phase diagram More
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Published: 31 January 2024
Fig. A39 Iron-manganese phase diagram More
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Published: 30 June 2023
Fig. 15.16 Magnesium and manganese content in common rigid container sheet alloys More
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Published: 01 August 2018
Fig. 7.10 Fe-Mn equilibrium phase diagram. Adding manganese to iron increases the range of temperatures in which the FCC phase is stable. Calculated diagram. Source: Refs 8 , 9 More
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Published: 01 August 2018
Fig. 8.34 Mapping of characteristic x-rays for elements manganese (varying from 1.3% to 1.6%) and phosphorus (from 0% to 0.03%) in the longitudinal section of a sample that was subjected to controlled cooling followed by quenching. Lighter regions indicate higher concentrations More
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Published: 01 August 2018
Fig. 8.35 Mapping of characteristic x-rays for elements manganese (varying from 1.3% to 1.6%) and phosphorus (from 0% to 0.03%) in the transverse section of a sample that was subjected to controlled cooling followed by quenching. Lighter regions indicate higher concentrations of these elements More
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Published: 01 August 2018
Fig. 8.78 Micrograph of as-cast steel. High concentration of dendritic manganese sulfide (sometimes called type II sulfide). No etching. More
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Published: 01 August 2018
Fig. 11.22 Manganese sulfide inclusions elongated in the longitudinal directions (parallel to the direction of larger elongation during hot working) in stainless steel AISI 304. Not etched. Courtesy of Villares Metals S.A. Sumaré, SP, Brazil. More
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Published: 01 August 2018
Fig. 11.23 Manganese sulfide inclusions elongated in the longitudinal directions (parallel to the direction of larger elongation during hot working) in a plate of structural steel. Not etched. Courtesy NIST (National Institute of Standards and Technology), Gaithersburg, MD, USA. Source: Ref More
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Published: 01 August 2018
Fig. 11.24 (a) Longitudinal cross section of wire rod, presenting elongated manganese sulfide nonmetallic inclusion. The hot working was concluded at 900 °C (1650 °F). Not etched. SEM, BE. (b) EDS x-ray spectrum of the inclusion presented in (a). More
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Published: 01 August 2018
Fig. 12.9 (a) Austenitic manganese steel. Polygonal austenitic grains and some non-metallic inclusions. Undeformed. Etchant: nital and picral. (b) Austenitic manganese steel lightly cold worked. The slip lines show with relative ease in a clear pattern in this type of steel. Etchant: nital. More