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malleable iron

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Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2022
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.isceg.t59320157
EISBN: 978-1-62708-332-4
... Abstract Malleable iron has unique properties that justify its application in the metal working industry. This chapter discusses the advantages, limitations, and mechanical properties of malleable iron; provides a description of the malleabilization process; and presents manufacturing...
Book Chapter

Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2001
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.aub.t61170100
EISBN: 978-1-62708-297-6
... Abstract This article explains how malleable iron is produced and how its microstructure and properties differ from those of gray and ductile iron. Malleable iron is first cast as white iron then annealed to convert the iron carbide into irregularly shaped graphite particles called temper...
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Published: 01 January 2022
Fig. 8.1 Malleable iron applications, (a) pole line iron fitting; (b) malleable fitting. Source: Ref 1 . Courtesy of American Foundry Society (AFS) More
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Published: 01 January 2022
Fig. 4.12 Comparison of properties of gray iron, malleable iron, ductile iron, and steel. Source: Ref 9 More
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Published: 01 August 2018
Fig. 17.98 Cross section of a part of whiteheart malleable iron produced by box decarburization using an oxidizing medium as decarburizing agent. Oxidized surface region, followed by fully decarburized ferritic layer. In the center region, temper graphite in a matrix of ferrite and pearlite More
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Published: 01 August 2018
Fig. 17.102 Blackheart malleable iron. Temper graphite. Not etched. More
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Published: 01 August 2018
Fig. 17.103 Typical heat treatment cycle to obtain ferritic blackheart malleable iron. The first stage, in which cementite is transformed into graphite, may take as long as 8 h. The subsequent cooling in the austenitic range should cause graphite precipitation, avoiding supersaturation More
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Published: 01 August 2018
Fig. 17.104 Blackheart malleable iron. Temper graphite in a ferrite matrix. Etchant: picral. More
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Published: 01 August 2018
Fig. 17.105 Ferritic blackheart malleable iron. Temper graphite formed during annealing in a ferrite matrix. Etchant: nital. Courtesy of J. Sertucha, Azterlan, Centro de Investigacion Metalurgica, Durango, Bizkaia, Spain. More
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Published: 01 August 2018
Fig. 17.106 Ferritic blackheart malleable iron. Temper graphite formed during annealing in a ferrite matrix. Some manganese sulfide inclusions are present. Etchant: nital. Courtesy of W. Guesser, Tupy Fundições, Joinville, SC, Brazil. More
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Published: 01 August 2018
Fig. 17.109 Blackheart malleable iron heat treated in conditions in which a “frame” of pearlite is formed. Etchant: picral. This part has been heat treated using a nonreactive solid packing instead of inert controlled atmosphere. In this case, as shown, both silicon oxidation More
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Published: 01 August 2018
Fig. 17.110 Galvanized blackheart malleable iron (the zinc layer is to the right of the image). Not etched. Courtesy of J. Sertucha, Azterlan, Centro de Investigacion Metalurgica, Durango, Bizkaia, Spain. More
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Published: 01 August 2018
Fig. 17.112 Two possible heat treatment cycles to produce blackheart malleable iron having either pearlite or pearlite + martensite structures. After graphitization, controlled cooling takes the austenite to approximately 870 °C (1600 °F). (a) Still or forced air cooling, or (b) homogenization More
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Published: 01 December 2001
Fig. 3 Stress-rupture plot for (a) pearlitic malleable iron and (b) alloyed pearlitic malleable iron. The solid lines are curves determined by the method of least squares from the existing data. The dashed lines define the 90% symmetrical tolerance interval. The lower dashed curve defines time More
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Published: 01 October 2011
Fig. 10.26 Malleable iron (Fe-2.65C-1.2Si-0.53Mn-0.06P-0.21S-0.08Cr-0.10Cu-0.07Ni-<0.01Al). Temper graphite type III with maximum size of 80 μm. As-polished. Original magnification: 100× More
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Published: 01 March 2002
Fig. 3.23 Microstructure of a malleable iron consisting of “temper carbon,” a form of graphite, in a matrix of ferrite. 2% nital etch. 200× More
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Published: 01 March 2002
Fig. 3.24 Microstructure of a malleable iron consisting of “temper carbon,” a form of graphite, surrounded by ferrite in a matrix of pearlite. 2% nital etch. 200× More
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Published: 01 March 2002
Fig. 3.25 Microstructure of a malleable iron with an incomplete malleablization heat treatment. Large, rounded, light etching areas (arrows) are undissolved cementite. 2% nital etch. 500× More
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Published: 01 December 1995
Fig. 10-11 Four in. (102 mm) cutter head converted from a malleable iron casting to a 0.65% carbon steel casting More
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Published: 01 December 1995
Fig. 10-12 A 4 lb (2 kg) winch clutch part converted from malleable iron to a low-alloy cast steel to prevent failure More