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lubricant

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Published: 01 June 1985
Fig. 5-41. Spur gear, 0.9×. High continual overloads broke down the lubricant barrier, causing deep adhesive wear. More
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Published: 30 September 2023
Figure 3.9: Surface roughness in rolling of lubricated aluminum with assorted lubricants. At very low film thickness, the surface of the tooling is impressed on the workpiece; at intermediate films, the final roughness depends on the film thickness. For large films, the surface roughness More
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Published: 30 September 2023
Figure 5.2: Shear strengths of various lubricant classes as a function of interface (hydrostatic) pressure. More
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Published: 30 September 2023
Figure 5.5: Modeling of lubricants in concentrated contacts. (a) Viscous lubricant (low pressure and Deborah number); (b) elastic (high Deborah number); (c) elastic-perfectly plastic solid (high pressure). More
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Published: 30 September 2023
Figure 5.11: An illustration of thermal activation, where a boundary lubricant (soap) forms during a first thermal cycle. This boundary lubricant persists upon cooling and reheating, improving the tribological performance thereafter. More
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Published: 30 September 2023
Figure 5.19: Percolation of lubricant from hydrostatic pits or pockets in the mixed lubrication regime. (a) Original pit geometry; (b) plastic deformation induced drawing of lubricant from the pits onto the surrounding plateau [ 43 ]. More
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Published: 30 September 2023
Figure 6.5: Typical lubricant rheology. (a) Increase in viscosity of some fatty oils with pressure at 100°C. The naphthenic and paraffinic lines are for η 0 = 0.0017 Pa-s at 50°C; (b) drop in viscosity with temperature at a pressure of 300 MPa. More
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Published: 30 September 2023
Figure 7.4: Comparison of lubricant performance in ring compression, plane-strain indentation, and wire-drawing of aluminum alloy 7075. More
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Published: 30 September 2023
Figure 9.19: Multiple die for promoting hydrodynamic lubrication. The lubricant has been eliminated for clarity; note the high pressure chambers to promote workpiece ductility and improved lubrication. More
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Published: 30 September 2023
Figure 10.17: Effect of lubricant viscosity (extrusion temperature) on forces registered in isothermal extrusion of aluminum using adietic acid as the lubricant. More
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Published: 30 September 2023
Figure 10.20: Hot extrusion with gradually melting polymer lubricant. More
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Published: 30 September 2023
Figure 11.6: Effect of lubricant on barreling in room temperature upsetting of aluminum alloy 7075 specimens. More
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Published: 30 September 2023
Figure 11.35: Deformation of a ring upset using a thick glass film as a lubricant. More
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Published: 30 September 2023
Figure 11.41: Lubricant system applied to aluminum alloys depending on severity of application as expressed by surface expansion [ 328 ]. More
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Published: 30 September 2023
Figure 12.31: Effects of lubricant kinematic viscosity in centistokes and blankholder load on maximum blank diameter (0.9-mm-thick mild steel sheet; 50.8-mm-diameter cup). More
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Published: 30 September 2023
Figure 12.33: Effects of lubricant viscosity on maximum blank diameter and required blankholder force (workpiece material is 70/30 annealed brass blank 0.96 mm thick; 50.8-mm-diameter cup). More
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Published: 30 September 2023
Figure 13.32: Effects of lubricant temperature on viscosity and tool life (annealed 3140 steel, HSS tool, f = 0.32 mm, d = 2.5 mm, v = 41 m/min, sulfurized mineral oil). More
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Published: 30 September 2023
Figure 13.38: Decrease in drill life with increasing lubricant viscosity (active sulfurized oil, 1 L/min, 6.35-mm-diameter drill at 4000 rpm). More
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Published: 01 December 2003
Fig. 6 Torque rheometry, function of parts per hundred of lubricant More
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Published: 30 April 2020
Fig. 4.2 A lubricant is selected for friction reduction, as evident in this plot for a 3.5 μm molybdenum powder treated with ethylene bis-stearamide as the lubricant. The force required to remove the compact from the tooling decreases rapidly with small concentrations of added lubricant, while More