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low-carbon steels

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Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2015
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.spsp2.t54410233
EISBN: 978-1-62708-265-5
... This chapter discusses various alloying and processing approaches to increase the strength of low-carbon steels. It describes hot-rolled low-carbon steels, cold-rolled and annealed low-carbon steels, interstitial-free or ultra-low carbon steels, high-strength, low-alloy (HSLA) steels, dual-phase...
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Published: 01 June 2008
Fig. 3.14 Strain aging in low-carbon steels More
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Published: 01 September 2008
Fig. 11 Piercing of low-carbon steels. Source: Ref 6 Edge characteristic Type 1 Type 2 Type 3 Type 4 Type 5 Fracture angle 14–16° 8–11° 7–11° 6–11° … Rollover (a) 10–20% t 8–10% t 6–8% t 4–7% t 2–5% t Burnish (a) 10–20% t (b) 15–25% t 25 More
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Published: 01 January 2015
Fig. 11.11 Precipitate dispersions in quench-aged low-carbon steels. (a) Carbides decorating dislocation lines in 0.052% C steel aged for 20 min at 97 °C (207 °F). (b) Plate-shaped carbides formed on dislocations in a 0.077% C steel aged for 115 h at 97 °C (207 °F). (c) Dendritic carbides More
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Published: 01 January 2015
Fig. 12.12 Yield strength as a function of ferrite grain size in low-carbon steels. Contributions of various other strengthening mechanisms, with ΔY a measure of strengthening from precipitation if applicable, are also indicated. Source: Ref 12.31 More
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Published: 01 January 2015
Fig. 12.15 Sketches of microstructural changes in low-carbon steels that develop as a function of finishing temperature in austenite and cooling to initiate ferrite formation. Source: Ref 12.30 More
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Published: 01 June 2008
Fig. 20.14 Microstructure development in low-carbon steels. Source: Ref 15 More
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Published: 01 November 2007
Fig. 8.7 Recrystallization temperature of low-carbon steels as a function of the amount of prior cold work. Source: Ref 8.5 More
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 31 December 2020
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.phtbp.t59310095
EISBN: 978-1-62708-326-3
... Abstract This chapter describes the designations of carbon and low-alloy steels and their general characteristics in terms of their response to hardening and mechanical properties. The steels covered are low-carbon steels, higher manganese carbon steels, boron-treated carbon steels, H-steels...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 August 1999
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.lmcs.t66560081
EISBN: 978-1-62708-291-4
... Abstract This chapter covers a broad range of low-carbon steels optimized for structural applications. Low-carbon structural steels are generally considered the highest-strength steels that can be welded without undue difficulty, even in the field. They include mild steels, carbon-manganese...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 August 1999
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.lmcs.t66560039
EISBN: 978-1-62708-291-4
... Abstract This chapter discusses the composition and structure of low-carbon irons and steels, particularly those used in the production of hot-rolled strip. It describes the manufacturing process from the production of ingots to coiling, and it explains how finishing and coiling temperatures...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 31 December 2020
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.phtbp.t59310203
EISBN: 978-1-62708-326-3
... and the applications of particular types or grades of carbon and low-alloy steels. The discussion covers carbon steel classification for heat treating, tempering of quenched carbon steels, and austempering of steel. In addition, the chapter discusses the effects of alloying and hardenability on steel and provides...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2017
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.sccmpe2.t55090043
EISBN: 978-1-62708-266-2
... Abstract This chapter addresses the issue of stress-corrosion cracking (SCC) in carbon and low-alloy steels. It discusses crack initiation, propagation, and fracture in aqueous chloride, hydrogen sulfide, sulfuric acid, hydroxide, ammonia, nitrate, ethanol, methanol, and hydrogen gas...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 1995
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.sch6.t68200233
EISBN: 978-1-62708-354-6
... and their influence on the properties and performance of structural carbon and low alloy steels and contains a summary of the relevant features of the ASTM product specifications. carbon steel low alloy steel mechanical properties metallurgical characteristics pressure containing parts structural steel...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 1996
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.phtpclas.9781627083539
EISBN: 978-1-62708-353-9
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 September 2008
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.fahtsc.t51130541
EISBN: 978-1-62708-284-6
... Abstract This appendix is a collection of tables listing coefficients of linear thermal expansion for carbon and low-alloy steels, presenting a summary of thermal expansion, thermal conductivity, and heat capacity; and listing thermal conductivities and specific heats of carbon and low-alloy...
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Published: 01 December 1996
Fig. 7-5 Microstructure of cold worked and annealed low carbon steel. A low-carbon sheet steel in the (a) as-cold rolled unannealed condition, (b) partially recrystallized annealed condition, and (c) fully recrystallized annealed condition. Marshall's etch. 1000 x (Adapted from B.L. Bramfitt More
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Published: 01 January 2015
Fig. 11.13 Low-strain portions of stress-strain curves of a low-carbon steel tested at various temperatures as shown. Source: Ref 11.6 More
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Published: 01 August 2013
Fig. 3.5 Inhomogeneous yielding of low carbon steel (a) and a linear polymer (b). After the initial stress maximum, the deformation in both materials occurs within a narrow band that propagates the length of the gage section before the stress rises again. More
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Published: 01 August 2018
Fig. 10.22 Low carbon steel overheated in the austenitic single-phase field. Ferrite in an incomplete network and acicular ferrite. The incomplete ferrite network makes it possible to estimate the austenitic grain size prior to cooling (≅ 290 μm). This indicates the possibility of overheating More