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low-alloy nickel

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Published: 01 December 1995
Fig. 16-1 Percent nickel in a series of heats of a cast Cr-Ni-Mo low-alloy steel ( 1 ) More
Book Chapter

Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2008
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.emea.t52240547
EISBN: 978-1-62708-251-8
... nickel alloys. Corrosion- and heat-resistant nickel alloys include commercially pure and low-alloy nickels, nickel-copper alloys, nickel-molybdenum and nickel-silicon alloys, nickel-chromium-iron alloys, nickel-chromium-molybdenum alloys, and nickel-chromium-iron-molybdenum-copper alloys. Special nickel...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 31 December 2020
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.phtbp.t59310095
EISBN: 978-1-62708-326-3
..., free-machining carbon steels, low-alloy manganese steels, low-alloy molybdenum steels, low-alloy chromium-molybdenum steels, low-alloy nickel-chromium-molybdenum steels, low-alloy nickel-molybdenum steels, low-alloy chromium steels, and low-alloy silicon-manganese steels. The chapter provides...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2001
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.aub.t61170495
EISBN: 978-1-62708-297-6
... high strengths for both low- and high-temperature services. Applications Nickel and nickel alloys are used for a wide variety of applications, the majority of which involve corrosion resistance and/or heat resistance. Some of these include components used in the chemical and petrochemical...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 September 2008
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.fahtsc.t51130541
EISBN: 978-1-62708-284-6
... or low-alloy nickel 11 6.3 Low-alloy special purpose tool steel 7.1–16 3.9–8.7 Pure Dysprosium (Dy) 9.3–13 5.2–7.2 Nickel molybdenum alloy steel 11–12 6.1–6.6 Pure Palladium (Pd) 11 6.3 Pure Thorium (Th) 11 6.4 Wrought iron 10–13 5.7–7.0 Oil-hardening cold work tool...
Book Chapter

Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2001
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.aub.t61170587
EISBN: 978-1-62708-297-6
... Abstract This article discusses the role of alloying in the production and use of low-expansion alloys such as iron-nickel (Invar), iron-nickel-chromium (Elinvar), and iron-nickel-cobalt (Super-Invar and Kovar). It explains how the coefficient of thermal expansion varies with nickel content...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 November 2010
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.sap.t53000009
EISBN: 978-1-62708-313-3
...) and/or γ″-Ni 3 Nb precipitates form in the fcc γ matrix. The second is the low-coefficient-of-thermal-expansion (CTE) group of alloys discussed subsequently. The third group of nickel-iron-base superalloys is the modified stainless steels, primarily strengthened by solid-solution hardening and minor...
Book Chapter

Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 1995
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.sch6.t68200295
EISBN: 978-1-62708-354-6
... of the habit of ordering “Hastelloy C” as a generic alloy. Hastelloy C-276 (low carbon with tungsten) replaced “C” but has no cast counterpart in ASTM-A494. CW12MW ordered with a 0.02% maximum carbon is a good equivalent. CW2M and CW6M are nickel-chromium-molybdenum alloys with no other alloying elements...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2006
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.cw.t51820125
EISBN: 978-1-62708-339-3
... Abstract Nickel-base alloys used for low-temperature aqueous corrosion are commonly referred to as corrosion-resistant alloys (CRAs), and nickel alloys used for high-temperature applications are known as heat-resistant alloys, high-temperature alloys, or superalloys. The emphasis...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 1995
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.sch6.t68200311
EISBN: 978-1-62708-354-6
... in excess of 25 ft/lb (34 J) at −100 °F (−73 °C), at a tensile strength of 91 ksi (627 MPa). A NDTT of −150° (101°) was determined, and the Charpy V-notch test results are shown in Figure 23-20 . This particular alloy is essentially nickel-free and may be useful in service that combines low temperature...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 October 2011
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.mnm2.t53060315
EISBN: 978-1-62708-261-7
... key alloy categories: Light metals (aluminum, beryllium, magnesium, and titanium) Corrosion-resistance alloys (cobalt, copper, nickel, titanium, aluminum) Superalloys (nickel, cobalt, iron-nickel) Refractory metals (molybdenum, niobium, rhenium, tantalum, and tungsten) Low-melting...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 September 2008
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.fahtsc.9781627082846
EISBN: 978-1-62708-284-6
Book Chapter

Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2001
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.aub.t61170107
EISBN: 978-1-62708-297-6
... applications fall into three major groups: The nickel-chromium white irons (class I in Table 1 ) are low-chromium alloys containing 3 to 5% Ni and 1 to 4% Cr, with one alloy modification that contains 7 to 11% Cr (class I, type D in Table 1 ). These martensitic white irons are commonly identified...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2015
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.cpi2.t55030176
EISBN: 978-1-62708-282-2
... and carbide growth kinetics in the ferrite phase. Nickel-base alloys are generally resistant to sensitization, because they are usually made either with sufficiently low carbon content or are stabilized with niobium. Stress-Corrosion Cracking Stress-corrosion cracking may occur in the presence...
Image
Published: 01 August 2005
Fig. 4.8 Coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) of low-carbon steel and iron-nickel alloys as a function of temperature. The low CTE of iron-nickel alloys exists only over a limited range of temperature. Normal expansion behavior is observed above about 400 °C (750 °F). More
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 July 1997
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.wip.t65930329
EISBN: 978-1-62708-359-1
...), electron-beam welding (EBW), and friction welding, can be used. Cleaning of Workpieces Nickel and nickel alloys are susceptible to embrittlement by lead, sulfur, phosphorus, and other low-melting-point metals and alloys. These materials may be present in grease, oil, paint, marking crayons, marking...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 November 2007
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.htcma.t52080249
EISBN: 978-1-62708-304-1
... Abstract This chapter examines the hot corrosion resistance of various nickel- and cobalt-base alloys in gas turbines susceptible to high-temperature (Type I) and low-temperature (Type II) hot corrosion. Type I hot corrosion is typically characterized by a thick, porous layer of oxides...
Book Chapter

Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2001
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.aub.t61170234
EISBN: 978-1-62708-297-6
... Metallurgy Maraging steels can be considered highly alloyed low-carbon, iron-nickel lath martensites. These alloys also contain small but significant amounts of titanium ( Table 1 ). The phase transformations in these steels can be explained with the help of the two phase diagrams shown in Fig. 2...
Book Chapter

Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 November 2010
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.sap.t53000059
EISBN: 978-1-62708-313-3
..., and is another significant drawback to high chromium levels ( Ref 1 ). As discussed in section 2.1.1, “Precipitation-Hardened Nickel-Iron Alloys,” in Chapter 2 of this book, chromium levels are kept minimal in the low-thermal-expansion alloys because of the Curie temperature-reduction effect caused by chromium...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 November 2007
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.htcma.t52080423
EISBN: 978-1-62708-304-1
... corrosion rates at temperatures up to 595 °C (1100 °F) ( Table 16.10 ). The major problem for low-chromium alloy steels in sodium is decarburization and resultant loss of strength ( Ref 35 ). For austenitic stainless steels and nickel-base alloys, the reaction between the alloy and the sodium leads...