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low alloy steel

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Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2006
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.cw.t51820013
EISBN: 978-1-62708-339-3
...Abstract Abstract Carbon and low-alloy steels are the most frequently welded metallic materials, and much of the welding metallurgy research has focused on this class of materials. Key metallurgical factors of interest include an understanding of the solidification of welds, microstructure...
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Published: 01 December 1995
Fig. 16-1 Percent nickel in a series of heats of a cast Cr-Ni-Mo low-alloy steel ( 1 ) More
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Published: 01 December 1995
Fig. 19-3 Characteristics of low alloy steel castings used for wear resistance. (a) Typical microstructure-quenched and tempered medium carbon steel. (b) An induction hardened layer on a gear tooth profile. (c) Hardness profile through the induction hardened layer of (b) above More
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Published: 01 March 2006
Fig. 4.31 Typical constant-life fatigue diagram for low-alloy steel 300M at room temperature. Source: Ref 4.10 More
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Published: 01 August 2018
Fig. 9.15 Martensite in low alloy steel ASTM A533 Cl.1 (ASME SA 533 Cl 1 or 20MnMoNi55) with C = 0.2%, Mn = 1.38%, Si = 0.25%, Ni = 0.83%, Mo = 0.49% continuously cooled at 50 °C/s (90 °F/s). Transformation start temperature: 415 °C (780 °F). Etchant: Nital 2%. Courtesy of B. Marini, CEA, France More
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Published: 01 August 2018
Fig. 9.27 Bainite in low alloy steel ASTM A 533 Cl.1 (ASME SA 533 Cl 1 or 20MnMoNi55) containing C = 0.2%, Mn = 1.38%, Si = 0.25%, Ni = 0.83%, Mo = 0.49% (same steel as in Fig. 9.15 ) continuously cooled at 0.1 °C/s (0.18 °F/s). Transformation start at 590 °C (1094 °F). Etchant: nital 2%. Prior More
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Published: 01 August 2018
Fig. 9.28 Bainite in low alloy steel ASTM A 533 Cl.1 (ASME SA 533 Cl 1 or 20MnMoNi55) containing C = 0.2%, Mn = 1.38%, Si = 0.25%, Ni = 0.83%, Mo = 0.49% (same steel as in Fig. 9.15 ) continuously cooled at 2 °C/s (3.5 °F/s). Transformation start at 590 °C (1094 °F). Etchant: nital 2%. Prior More
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Published: 01 December 2018
Fig. 6.110 Oil-ash corrosion in low-alloy steel tube: (a) scale formation, (b) wall thinning More
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Published: 01 September 2008
Fig. 64 ASTM B7 low-alloy steel bolt grade. Fracture initiated along threads, with typical and pronounced beach marks (i.e., cyclic fracture propagation) and transgranular fracture mode. (a) Location of bolts in pump coupling. (b) Beach marks showing asymmetrical bending with initiation at high More
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Published: 01 October 2011
Fig. 9.15 Lath martensite in water-quenched low-alloy steel. 2% nital etch. Original magnification 500× Source: Ref 9.6 More
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Published: 01 September 2008
Fig. 40 Hydrogen embrittlement failure of an ISO 10.9 low-alloy steel bolt grade. (a) As-received bolt. (b) Multiple initiation sites with secondary cracks evident. (c) Intergranular fracture along prior-austenite grain boundaries More
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Published: 01 January 2017
Fig. 2.3 Transgranular hydrogen sulfide SCC of a low-alloy steel. Original magnification: 100×. Source: Ref 2.21 More
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Published: 01 January 2017
Fig. 3.38 Effect of pH on delayed failure stress for low-alloy steel in H 2 S saturated acetic acid solution containing sodium acetate buffer. Source: Ref 3.46 More
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Published: 01 March 2002
Fig. 8.17 Water-quenched low-alloy steel showing clearly delineated prior austenite grain boundaries. Matrix is lath martensite. Marshall’s reagent. 200× More
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Published: 01 December 1995
Fig. 1-4 Carbon and Low Alloy Steel Markets (1993) More
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Published: 01 December 1995
Fig. 2-74 Low alloy steel case for small tubine More
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Published: 01 September 2005
Fig. 13 P/M transfer gear made of high-strength low-alloy steel. (a) Original P/M processing technique, which required machining of flange section. (b) Modified P/M technique, which required no additional machining More
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Published: 30 November 2013
Fig. 2 Creep curves for a molybdenum-vanadium low-alloy steel under tension at four stress levels at 600 °C (1112 °F). Source: Ref 2 More
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Published: 01 July 1997
Fig. 5 Relationship between toughness and manganese content in low-alloy steel welds. Source: Ref 6 More
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2001
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.aub.t61170193
EISBN: 978-1-62708-297-6
...Abstract Abstract This article discusses the effect of alloying on high-strength low-alloy (HSLA) steels. It explains where HSLA steels fit in the continuum of commercial steels and describes the six general categories into which they are divided. It provides composition data for standard types...