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lightning strikes

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Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 November 2010
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.omfrc.t53030245
EISBN: 978-1-62708-349-2
... within the composite part. This chapter describes the macroeffects of a lightning strike on composites and discusses the methods involved in the assessment of microstructural damage in composites. lightning damage microstructure non-destructive inspection polymer composites visual damage...
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Published: 01 November 2010
Fig. 15.16 Lightning strike zones on commercial airliners. Source: Ref 7 More
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Published: 01 November 2010
Fig. 15.17 Lightning strike on wing. Source: Ref 7 More
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Published: 01 November 2010
Fig. 15.18 Lightning strike damage of carbon/epoxy laminate More
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Published: 01 November 2010
Fig. 15.2 Montage of the edge of the lightning strike zone that corresponds to section plane B in Fig. 15.1 . Slightly uncrossed polarized light, 10× objective (25× objective insets) More
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Published: 01 November 2010
Fig. 15.4 Micrograph taken at an area under the lightning strike zone showing delamination and microcracking in the composite. Epi-fluorescence, 390–440 nm excitation, 10× objective More
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Published: 01 November 2010
Fig. 15.7 Area under the lightning strike zone where the expanded aluminum foil was vaporized. The surface shows only slight damage. Slightly uncrossed polarized light, 10× objective More
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Published: 01 November 2010
Fig. 15.8 Macroimage of an area under the lightning strike attachment point showing crushing of a honeycomb cell wall. Bright-field illumination, 65mm macrophotograph More
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Published: 01 November 2010
Fig. 15.13 Lightning strike damage in a carbon fiber composite laminate having metal foil on the surface for protection. (a) Slightly uncrossed polarized light, 4× objective. (b) Transmitted light (ultrathin section), circular polarized light, 4× objective. The impregnation outline of the epoxy More
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Published: 01 November 2010
Fig. 15.15 Lightning strike damage in a carbon fiber composite material showing fiber and matrix vaporization and degradation as well as microcracking. Bright-field illumination, 25× objective More
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 November 2010
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.scm.t52870401
EISBN: 978-1-62708-314-0
... radiation, lightning strikes, thermal oxidation, and extreme temperatures. It also discusses the factors that influence flammability. environmental degradation flammability heat damage lightning strikes polymeric matrix composites thermo-oxidative stability ultraviolet radiation EXPOSURE...
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Published: 01 November 2010
Fig. 15.5 Micrograph taken under the strike zone showing damage induced by the lightning strike. Epi-fluorescence, 390–440 nm excitation, 25× objective More
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Published: 01 November 2010
Fig. 15.6 Photograph of a painted composite surface, protected with expanded aluminum foil, after a zone 1A lab-induced lightning strike. A cross-sectional map is superimposed over the lightning-strike-damaged area. More
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Published: 01 November 2010
Fig. 15.14 Carbon fiber composite cross sections showing heat damage from lab-induced lightning strikes. (a) Section showing heat-affected fibers. Bright-field illumination, 10× objective. (b) Area under the strike zone showing matrix crazing due to the impact. Bright-field illumination, 10 More
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Published: 01 November 2010
Fig. 15.12 Interply and intraply arcing events that occurred in a carbon fiber composite after being subjected to a lab-induced lightning strike. Comparison of different contrast methods: bright-field illumination and epi-fluorescence, 390–440 nm excitation, 25× objective More
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Published: 01 November 2010
Fig. 15.1 Photograph of a painted carbon-fiber-reinforced composite part surface after a zone 1A lab-induced lightning strike. Two cross sections were taken from this area after impregnation with a casting resin. The cross sections for microscopic analysis are labeled “A” and “B More
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Published: 01 November 2010
Fig. 2.11 Composite material that was subjected to a laboratory-induced lightning strike. The section shown is 1 mm (0.04 in.) away from the center of the strike. This sample was first impregnated with Rhodamine-B-dyed epoxy casting resin and then, after sectioning, mounted with Coumarin 35 More
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 November 2019
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.mfadr7.t91110513
EISBN: 978-1-62708-247-1
...”, and exhibits as a typical EOS (electrical overstress) signature during failure analysis of the device. This has even been observed in modern car electronics when lightning strikes close to an operating vehicle – creating numerous EOS (electrical overstress) signatures in several electronic components...
Book Chapter

Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2003
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.pnfn.t65900071
EISBN: 978-1-62708-350-8
... “foggy,” resulting in ineffective nitriding of the internal surface areas of holes. Pressure is one of the principal areas of control. If the pressure conditions are correct and the voltage is too high, then a discharge will occur much like a lightning strike. This occurrence is known as the arc...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 November 2010
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.scm.t52870489
EISBN: 978-1-62708-314-0