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light microscope

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Image
Published: 01 March 2002
Fig. 6.1 A typical image analyzer setup showing light microscope with camera attachment at the left, video monitor in the center, and microprocessor with command monitor at the right. The microstructure displayed on the center monitor is the AISI/SAE 1020 steel shown in Fig. 6.2 . More
Image
Published: 01 March 2002
Fig. 6.4 Digitizing pad setup with a light microscope attached to the pad (or tablet) at right. The drawing tube (horizontal tube) is attached to the right side of the microscope. A printer is shown at the left. More
Image
Published: 01 March 2002
Fig. 6.32 A hot-stage attachment mounted on the stage of a light microscope. The view of the specimen is through the rotating quartz window, shown at the tope of the device. More
Image
Published: 01 April 2013
Fig. 7 Basic components of a polarizing light microscope. Source: Ref 1 More
Image
Published: 01 August 2005
Fig. 2.33 Cleavage fracture in a low-carbon martensitic steel. (a) Light microscope cross section with nickel plating at top showing the fracture profile. (b) Direct light photograph. (c) Direct SEM fractograph. (d) Light fractograph of replica. (e) SEM fractograph of replica. (f) TEM More
Image
Published: 01 December 1984
Figure 4-25 Light-section microscope and schematic of the light path. (Courtesy of C. Zeiss, Inc.) More
Image
Published: 01 December 1984
Figure 4-23 Schematic of Linnik system reflected light two-beam interference microscope. (Courtesy of E. Leitz, Inc.) More
Book Chapter

Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 1984
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.mpp.t67850267
EISBN: 978-1-62708-260-0
... Abstract This chapter discusses the tools and techniques of light microscopy and how they are used in the study of materials. It reviews the basic physics of light, the inner workings of light microscopes, and the relationship between resolution and depth of field. It explains the difference...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 March 2002
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.mgppis.t60400149
EISBN: 978-1-62708-258-7
... Abstract Several specialized instruments are available for the metallographer to use as tools to gather key information on the characteristics of the microstructure being analyzed. These include microscopes that use electrons as a source of illumination instead of light and x-ray diffraction...
Image
Published: 01 March 2002
Fig. 6.6 The image of the cursor superimposed on the field of the microstructure. This image was taken through the light microscope to illustrate what the metallographer would observe if a specimen on the microscope stage was being measured. More
Image
Published: 01 January 1998
Fig. 5-18 Pearlitic microstructures in 52100 steel (a) and 4150 steel (b). In the 52100 steel the roughly parallel lamellae of pearlite are resolved, but in the 4150 steel the interlamellar spacing is too fine to be resolved in the light microscope. Light micrographs. Courtesy of K. Hayes More
Image
Published: 01 December 2000
Fig. 9.7 Micrographs showing martensitically transformed solute bands (small arrows) in dissimilar alloy gas-tungsten arc welding between Ti-6Al-4V and Ti-15V-3Cr-3Al-3Sn sheets. (a) Visible light microscope; large arrow indicates fusion line. (b) Scanning electron microscope More
Image
Published: 01 October 2011
Fig. 9.9 Different appearance of ferrite and cementite (Fe 3 C) constituents of pearlite when examined by optical (light) microscope and scanning electron microscope (SEM). A polished specimen is chemically etched such that the Fe 3 C platelets stand out in relief. (a) In optical microscopy More
Image
Published: 01 January 2015
Fig. 5.27 Distribution of lath widths in Fe-0.2C martensite. Vertical line shows limit of resolution of the light microscope. Source: Ref 5.51 More
Image
Published: 01 January 2000
Fig. 21 A lacquered steel can lid exhibiting filiform corrosion showing both large and small filaments partially oriented in the rolling direction of the steel sheet. Without this 10× magnification by a light microscope, the filiforms look like fine striations or minute tentacles. More
Image
Published: 01 April 2013
Fig. 11 Specific lighting devices: (a and b) fiber optics, (c) microscope ring light, (d) microscope light, (e) ring flash, (f) microscope illuminator using fluorescent and ultraviolet tubes. Source: Ref 1 More
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2015
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.spsp2.t54410001
EISBN: 978-1-62708-265-5
..., grain or crystal size, is the micron or micrometer (μm), 10 −6 m, or 0.001 mm (0.00004 in.), well below features that are resolvable by eye. The light microscope has a resolution on the order of 0.5 μm and therefore is quite adequate for the characterization of many features of steel microstructures...
Book Chapter

Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 August 1999
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.lmcs.t66560001
EISBN: 978-1-62708-291-4
..., the workhorse undoubtedly is the light microscope. [1] Light microscopy is used by almost all metallographers and, indeed, is the only technique available to many—particularly those working in smaller laboratories. The applications of this particular examinational technique are covered in this monograph...
Book Chapter

Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 April 2013
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.imub.t53720161
EISBN: 978-1-62708-305-8
...×—the approximate useful limit of light microscopy. Microscopic examination of a properly prepared specimen will clearly reveal structural characteristics, such as grain size, segregation, and the shape, size, and distribution of the phases and inclusions, that are present. The microstructure revealed also...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 March 2002
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.mgppis.t60400109
EISBN: 978-1-62708-258-7
... light for transparent material, for example, stained biological specimens. Metallographic specimens are opaque to light, and therefore, a metallurgical microscope needs a source of reflected light. This source of light is discussed in the following sections. Both kinds of microscopes are commonly called...