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Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 November 2012
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.ffub.t53610263
EISBN: 978-1-62708-303-4
... Abstract This chapter discusses the fatigue behavior of bolted, riveted, and welded joints. It describes the relative strength of machined and rolled threads and the effect of thread design, preload, and clamping force on the fatigue strength of bolts made from different steels. It explains...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 August 1999
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.caaa.t67870161
EISBN: 978-1-62708-299-0
..., of the Engineered Materials Handbook. Corrosion of Welded Joints Aluminum and its alloys can be joined by as many or more methods as any other metal. The primary welding methods used are the gas-shielded arc welding processes, that is, gas metal arc welding (GMAW) and gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 November 2010
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.scm.t52870449
EISBN: 978-1-62708-314-0
... Abstract This chapter discusses the use of mechanical fastening and adhesive bonding, the primary methods for joining polymer matrix composites. It describes and analyzes the basic types of mechanically fastened joints, including single-hole and multirow bolted composite joints. It then reviews...
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Published: 01 December 2009
Fig. 12.8 Defective solder joints. Note the poor solder joints on the left side of the component. Such defects can induce open circuits or create a short circuit if the solder forms a bridge between components. Solder spatter of the type shown here can also be induced by excess energy More
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Published: 30 June 2023
Fig. 10.23 Possible shear failure modes for adhesive joints. (a) Adhesion, (b) cohesion, and (c) mixed failures More
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Published: 01 December 2015
Fig. 19 Localized corrosion of asbestos-gasketed flanged joints in a type 304 stainless steel piping system. (a) Single remaining biodeposit adjacent to resulting corrosion on the flange. Numerous other similar deposits were dislodged in opening the joint. (b) Closeup of gouging-type corrosion More
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Published: 01 August 1999
Fig. 11.2 Brazed and braze-welded joints. (a) 0.10% C (0.09C-0.005SI-0.41 Mn, wt%). Brazed using a gas torch and silver solder (49.6Ag-15.0Cu-18.1 Zn-17.3Cd) as a filler metal. Nital. 250×. (b) 0.1% C (0.09C-0.005Si-0.43Mn, wt%). Furnace brazed using copper filler metal. Nital. 250×. (c More
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Published: 30 November 2013
Fig. 5 The principle of the arch. Joints between stone blocks are radial, or perpendicular, to the inner surface of the arch. The greater the load above the arch, the more tightly the inner blocks are squeezed together by compressive forces, making a very stable structure. More
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Published: 01 August 2005
Fig. 1.5 The strength of pressure-welded joints as a function of the deformation induced during the bonding process. No joining occurs below the threshold deformation level. With increasing deformation the joint strength also increases eventually up to that of the parent materials. Note More
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Published: 01 August 2005
Fig. 2.18 Tensile strength of butt joints made with low-silver brazing alloys between mild steel components as a function of the joint clearance More
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Published: 01 August 2005
Fig. 2.20 Lugless joints made between mild steel tubes using (a) the 54Cu-35Zn-6Ni-4Mn-1Si brazing alloy and (b) the reference 44Ag-30Cu-26Zn brazing alloy More
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Published: 01 August 2005
Fig. 2.28 Effect of impurity elements on the impact strength of joints made in mild steel using an Ag-Cu-Zn-Cd filler alloy. Adapted from Boughton and Sloboda [1970] More
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Published: 01 August 2005
Fig. 3.12 Effect of rare earth additions on the tensile strength of joints made to copper test pieces using Cu-8Sn-7P-6Ni-RE braze by flame heating. The optimum addition appears to be about 0.2 wt%. More
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Published: 01 August 2005
Fig. 3.13 Tensile strength of copper-to-copper joints brazed with amorphous Cu-7P- x Ni- y Sn-7P-0.2RE braze by flame heating. The respective values of x and y are given alongside the bars on the chart. Maximum strength is achieved with 4% nickel and 6% tin. More
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Published: 01 August 2005
Fig. 4.21 Impact test on brazed T-joints, clearly demonstrating the role of fillets in enhancing joint strength. Substrate: mild steel. Braze: Ag-Cu-Cd-Zn More
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Published: 01 August 2005
Fig. 4.36 Recommended designs of (a) lap, (b) butt, and (c) strap joints for different stress environments More
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Published: 01 August 2005
Fig. 4.38 Relationship between the fracture stress and joint thickness of butt joints in medium-carbon steel test pieces made with a silver-base braze. Very narrow joint gaps tend to be inadequately filled, thereby causing the measured joint strengths to decline. Adapted from Sloboda [1961] More
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Published: 01 August 2005
Fig. 4.43 Schematic illustrations showing the corrosion of butt joints between copper pipes conveying tap water. (a) Ag-Cu-Zn braze. (b) Ag-Cu-P braze More
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Published: 01 August 2005
Fig. 4.44 Schematic illustration showing the corrosion of butt joints between stainless steel pipes conveying tap water, joined with an Ag-Cu-Zn braze More
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Published: 01 August 2005
Fig. 7.19 Four-point bend strength of joints made to silicon nitride with a silver-copper-hafnium braze as a function of hafnium content. The optimum concentration for formation of a continuous, but thin, layer of reaction product appears to be in the range 3–5%. More