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interfacing

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Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2008
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.tm.t52320123
EISBN: 978-1-62708-357-7
... Abstract This chapter considers various behaviors of microstructural interfaces from a thermodynamics viewpoint. It discusses energy of surface and interface, the Gibbs-Thomson Effect, grain-boundary segregation, smooth and rough interfaces, and grain growth. gas molecules grain boundary...
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Published: 30 September 2023
Figure 11.29: Interface pressure p , interface shear strength τ i , and coefficient of friction μ obtained by the oblique pin technique in upsetting of aluminum billets ( d 0 /h 0 = 4) to 10% reduction. (a) Dry platens; (b) lubricated with a compounded mineral oil; (c) lubricated More
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Published: 01 December 2008
Fig. 5.13 Morphology of interface in a solidification structure. (a) Interface between covalent compound and liquid phase, magnification 150 ×. (b) Interface between metal crystal and liquid phase, magnification 800 ×. More
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Published: 01 December 2008
Fig. 5.14 (a) Kossel’s smooth interface. (b) Jackson’s rough interface. Data points ● in (b) indicate the minimum points. More
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Published: 01 March 2012
Fig. 8.14 Interface between M 7 C 3 and ferrite seen in Fig. 8.13 . The interface is semicoherent, pinning any movement. Source: Ref 8.10 as published in Ref 8.1 More
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Published: 30 September 2023
Figure 3.1: The die-workpiece interface on the (a) macro and (b) micro scales. More
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Published: 30 September 2023
Figure 3.11: Examples of contact at low interface pressures with plastic deformation limited to asperity peaks. (a) Initial contact between tooling and workpieces in upsetting; (b) tooling/flange contact in deep drawing; (c) flank face interaction with workpiece in machining. More
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Published: 30 September 2023
Figure 3.12: Examples of low interface pressure resulting from yielding in a combined stress state. (a) Blank holder region in deep drawing of a cylindrical cup; (b) wire drawing. More
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Published: 30 September 2023
Figure 3.13: Examples of high interface pressure resulting from yielding in a compressive stress state. (a) Metal rolling; (b) impression or closed-die forging; (c) extrusion. More
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Published: 30 September 2023
Figure 5.2: Shear strengths of various lubricant classes as a function of interface (hydrostatic) pressure. More
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Published: 30 September 2023
Figure 5.20: Interface shear strength with various lubricants on aluminum after 80% reduction in height. More
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Published: 30 September 2023
Figure 8.9: Interface pressure distribution in dry rolling of aluminum strip on rough rolls. More
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Published: 30 September 2023
Figure 10.1: Forward extrusion with conical die entry (arrows indicate interface shear stresses acting on the material). More
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Published: 30 September 2023
Figure 11.14: Pressure-multiplying factor for predicting average interface pressure in frictionless plane-strain indentation. More
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Published: 30 September 2023
Figure 11.28: Drop in calculated interface shear strength in repeated plane-strain compression, showing the effects of (a) cleaning of the die and (b) die surface roughness. More
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Published: 30 September 2023
Figure 13.21: Effects of tool/chip contact length ( L = χt ) and interface shear strength ( τ i = βk c ) on energy consumed in machining. More
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Published: 01 June 1985
Fig. 5-24. Internal stress rupture. Origin at case/core interface near top of tooth. In extreme cases, the entire tooth top may pop off. More
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Published: 01 June 1985
Fig. 4-26. Spalling—a subsurface fatigue failure originating at the case/core interface, subsequently progressing under the case. More
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Published: 01 January 2015
Fig. 4.14 Schematics of interface growth fronts associated with the transformation of austenite to (a) pearlite and (b) dispersed cementite particles in ferrite. Source: Ref 4.18 More
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Published: 01 January 2015
Fig. 4.18 Stepped cementite interfaces in (a) 52100 steel transformed at 785 °C (1450 °F) for 30 min and (b) 52100 steel transformed at 785 °C for 2h. SEM micrographs taken from fracture surfaces. Courtesy of T. Ando, Colorado School of Mines More