1-20 of 230 Search Results for

induction welding

Follow your search
Access your saved searches in your account

Would you like to receive an alert when new items match your search?
Close Modal
Sort by
Image
Published: 01 November 2011
Fig. 4.9 Joining a tube seam by high-frequency induction welding. Source: Ref 4.5 More
Image
Published: 01 June 1988
Fig. 6.18 Plot used to determine power requirements for induction welding of steel pipe. The required power in kilowatts is equal to the product of the line speed (in fpm), the pipe wall thickness (in in.), the width of the heated zone (in in.), and V as determined from the plot. From G. F More
Image
Published: 01 June 1988
Fig. 6.26 Eddy-current path in high-frequency induction welding of tubular products. From C. A. Tudbury, Basics of Induction Heating , Vol 1, John F. Rider, Inc., New York, 1960 ( Ref 2 ) More
Image
Published: 01 June 1988
Fig. 6.27 Recommend clearance between coil ID and tube OD during induction welding of tubular products. From J. A. Redmond, Induction/Resistance Tube and Pipe Welding , Westinghouse Electric Corp., Baltimore ( Ref 18 ) More
Image
Published: 01 June 1988
Fig. 6.25 Squeeze-roll arrangements for induction tube welding: (a) two-roll; (b) two-roll with supplementary roll; (c) three-roll. From J. Davies and P. Simpson, Induction Heating Handbook , McGraw-Hill, Ltd., London, 1979 ( Ref 13 ) More
Image
Published: 31 December 2020
Fig. 7 Seam annealer for tube-welding line. Courtesy of EFD Induction. Source: Ref 12 More
Book Chapter

Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 1988
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.eihdca.t65220001
EISBN: 978-1-62708-341-6
... Abstract Electromagnetic induction, or simply "induction," is a method of heating electrically conductive materials such as metals. It is commonly used for heating workpieces prior to metalworking and in heat treating, welding, and melting. This technique also lends itself to various other...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 1988
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.eihdca.t65220085
EISBN: 978-1-62708-341-6
... temperature, and so forth. The major applications of induction technology include through heating, surface heating (for surface heat treatment), metal melting, welding, brazing, and soldering. This chapter summarizes the selection of equipment and related design considerations for these applications...
Book Chapter

Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 1988
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.eihdca.t65220315
EISBN: 978-1-62708-341-6
... Welding The use of high-frequency induction and resistance heating for tube welding also appears very attractive from a cost viewpoint. Not only is the cost per unit of product considerably less with these techniques than with submerged-arc welding (SAW) and fluxed-cored arc welding (FCAW...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 November 2011
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.jub.t53290079
EISBN: 978-1-62708-306-5
... by the flow of high-frequency current at the faying surfaces, with upsetting forces perpendicular to the interface. Although similar in many respects, two separate high-frequency welding processes can be identified: high-frequency resistance welding and high-frequency induction welding, In high-frequency...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 November 2010
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.scm.t52870183
EISBN: 978-1-62708-314-0
... composites can be joined by melt fusion, dual resin bonding, resistance welding, ultrasonic welding, or induction welding, as well as by conventional adhesive bonding and mechanical fastening. Adhesive Bonding In general, structural bonds using thermoset such as epoxy adhesives produce lower bond...
Book Chapter

Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 1988
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.eihdca.t65220253
EISBN: 978-1-62708-341-6
... Review , Vol 1, No. 5, p 1 ( Ref 9 ) Materials Handling in other Induction Heating Processes Two other induction heating processes in which material handling plays an important role are welding and melting. The fabrication of high-frequency induction welded tubing has been discussed in Chapter...
Image
Published: 01 June 1988
Fig. 8.39 Two types of split-return coils. (a) Split-return coil for annealing of seam welds in pipe or tube. (b) Split-return inductor for hardening of surfaces of large sprocket teeth one tooth at a time (welding fixture not shown). From C. A. Tudbury, Basics of Induction Heating , Vol 1 More
Image
Published: 01 June 1988
Fig. 6.28 Welding speed as a function of wall thickness and input power for fabrication of 25-mm- (1-in.-) diam steel tubing. For other outer diameters, the welding speed should be multiplied by the correction factor given in the inset. For other metals, the speed should be multiplied by 1.4 More
Book Chapter

Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2008
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.ssde.t52310201
EISBN: 978-1-62708-286-0
... when contemplating the use of spot welds in stainless materials. The possibility of entrapment of foreign material and the difficulty of removing it from such crevices should also be considered, especially in equipment for food handling, pharmaceutical production, etc. High-Frequency Induction...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 August 2015
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.piht2.t55050245
EISBN: 978-1-62708-311-9
... products, forgings, flat-rolled products, rolled shapes, and welded joints. In addition, ultrasonic inspection techniques have been used for monitoring the initiation and presence of fatigue cracks. Ultrasonics are being used to measure the case depth of induction-hardened parts such as axles, shafts...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2017
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.sccmpe2.t55090349
EISBN: 978-1-62708-266-2
... for last-pass heat-sink welding (LPHSW) of a 610 mm (24 in.) diam type 304 stainless steel pipe. Source: Ref 15.12 15.4.4 Induction Heating Stress Improvement (IHSI) The IHSI process was conceived, developed, and first implemented in Japan ( Ref 15.13 , 15.14 ). Induction heating is used...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2006
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.cw.t51820177
EISBN: 978-1-62708-339-3
... Stress Reduction Solutions The tensile stress solutions primarily affect the weld residual stress profile by placing the inner surface weld residual stress in compression. These solutions, which are discussed in this chapter, include heat sink welding, induction heating stress improvement, and last...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 November 2011
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.jub.t53290279
EISBN: 978-1-62708-306-5
... Abstract This chapter reviews materials issues encountered in joining, including challenges involved in welding of dissimilar metal combinations; joining of plastics by mechanical fastening, solvent and adhesive bonding, and welding; joining of thermoset and thermoplastic composite materials...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2008
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.emea.t52240395
EISBN: 978-1-62708-251-8
..., liquid nitriding, carbonitriding, and hardfacing. The chapter describes two surface hardening processes by localized heat treatment: flame hardening and induction hardening. It also briefly summarizes other surface hardening processes, namely, aluminizing, siliconizing, chromizing, titanium carbide...