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induction surface hardening

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Published: 01 September 2008
Fig. 46 Residual stress profile below the surface after induction surface hardening. Source: Ref 15 More
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Published: 01 September 2008
Fig. 7 Single-shot induction surface hardening of a cylindrical workpiece. Source: Ref 15 , 16 More
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Published: 01 September 2008
Fig. 9 Different methods of induction surface hardening of gear wheels. Source: Ref 15 , 16 More
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Published: 01 September 2008
Fig. 19 Typical examples of induction surface hardening of (a) carbon steel and (b) alloyed steel gears produced from carbon steel (a) and alloyed steel (b) More
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Published: 01 September 2008
Fig. 31 Hardness reached after induction surface hardening at various heating rates in steel with 0.45% C. Source: Ref 15 , 27 More
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Published: 01 September 2008
Fig. 48 Residual-stress profiles after induction surface hardening at various input energies. Source: Ref 15 , 54 More
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Published: 01 September 2008
Fig. 49 Temperature cycles during single-shot induction surface hardening, at various depths. Source: Ref 15 , 54 More
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Published: 01 September 2008
Fig. 55 Residual-stress profile after induction surface hardening on sample A of the mean bearing location in the middle of the crankshaft and on sample C on the extreme left side. Source: Ref 15 , 20 , 44 More
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Published: 01 September 2008
Fig. 60 Residual-stress profiles after induction surface hardening for heterogeneous and homogeneous austenite at austenitizing temperature. Source: Ref 20 , 47 More
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Published: 01 September 2008
Fig. 74 Distortion after induction surface hardening with (a) dual frequency and (b) single frequency. Source: Ref 20 , 57 More
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Published: 01 September 2008
Fig. 79 Subsurface residual-stress profile after induction surface hardening and grinding (absolute stress) on bearing location “A”. Source: Ref 15 More
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Published: 01 September 2008
Fig. 102 Worm characteristics after induction surface hardening. Source: Ref 83 More
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Published: 01 June 1988
Fig. 7.6 Case depth obtained by induction surface hardening of a steel bar as a function of ∫   I c 2 dt , where l c and t denote induction coil current and time, respectively. From J. D. Verhoeven, H. L. Downing, and E. D. Gibson, Journal of Heat Treating , Vol 4, No. 3, June More
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Published: 01 September 2008
Fig. 65 Residual-stress distribution in the induction surface-hardened layer of the gear tooth. Source: Ref 15 , 20 More
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Published: 01 September 2008
Fig. 83 Hardness profile in the induction surface-hardened layer and microhardness profile in a very thin surface layer for bearing location “A”. Source: Ref 44 More
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Published: 01 September 2008
Fig. 84 Hardness profile in the induction surface-hardened layer and microhardness profile in a very thin surface layer for bearing location “C”. Source: Ref 44 More
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Published: 01 September 2008
Fig. 94 Comparison of fatigue life of induction surface-hardened transmission shafts with that of through-hardened and carburized shafts. Arrow in lower bar (induction-hardened shafts) indicates that one shaft had not failed after testing for the maximum number of cycles shown. Source: Ref 45 More
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Published: 01 August 2015
Fig. 10.3 Comparison of fatigue life of induction surface-hardened transmission shafts with that of through-hardened and carburized shafts. Arrow in lower bar (induction-hardened shafts) indicates that one shaft had not failed after testing for the maximum number of cycles shown. Source: Ref More
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Published: 01 October 2011
Fig. 9.31 Surface hardening of steel by induction. (a) Tooth-by-tooth induction hardening of a gear. (b) Hardening of hammerheads. Courtesy of Ajax Tocco Magnethermic More
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 September 2008
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.fahtsc.t51130417
EISBN: 978-1-62708-284-6
... for induction heating and quenching, the use of magnetic flux concentrators to improve the efficiency of surface heating, and the quenching systems used for induction hardening. The discussion also provides information on time-temperature dependence in induction heating, workpiece distortion in induction...