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Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 August 2018
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.msisep.t59220129
EISBN: 978-1-62708-259-4
..., macro- and microsegregation, and hot cracking, as well as the effects of solidification and remelting on castings, ingots, and continuous cast products. It explains how to determine where defects originate in continuous casters and how to control alumina, sulfide, and nitride inclusions...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2004
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.aacppa.t51140047
EISBN: 978-1-62708-335-5
... Abstract Porosity in aluminum is caused by the precipitation of hydrogen from liquid solution or by shrinkage during solidification, and more usually by a combination of these effects. Nonmetallic inclusions entrained before solidification influence porosity formation and mechanical properties...
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Published: 01 September 2008
Fig. 37 Slim, cracklike inclusions in the 52100 steel. The inclusions are oriented in the longitudinal direction of the component. No etch More
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Published: 01 January 2015
Fig. 9.5 Schematic diagram of the inclusions that form in as-cast aluminum-killed steels and the changes produced in inclusion morphology by hot rolling. “A” represents Al 2 O 3 and “C” represents CaO. Source: Ref 9.9 More
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Published: 01 January 2015
Fig. 9.7 Elongated MnS inclusions in a low-carbon steel. As-polished surface, longitudinal section, light micrograph, original magnification at 500×. Courtesy of Mark Richards, Colorado School of Mines More
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Published: 01 January 2015
Fig. 9.24 Ferrite bands with MnS inclusions and pearlite bands in 10V45 steel bar hot rolled to a reduction ratio of 27:1. Light micrograph, longitudinal section, nital etch. Courtesy of J. Dyck. Source: Ref 9.58 More
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Published: 01 March 2002
Fig. 8.3 As-polished specimen of oxide inclusions in a specimen of Lancashire iron. 100× More
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Published: 01 March 2002
Fig. 8.4 As-polished specimen of wrought iron showing slag inclusions. 50× More
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Published: 01 August 1999
Fig. 5.15 (Part 1) Deformation of manganese sulfide inclusions during hot rolling. (a) and (b) Semikilled resulfurized low-carbon steel (type I sulfides present in ingot. 0.13C-0.01 Si-1.11Mn-0.28S-0.003Al-0.0290 (wt%). (a) Rolled at 900 °C, reduced 8×. Unetched. 250×. (b) Rolled More
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Published: 01 August 1999
Fig. 5.21 (Part 1) Identification of manganese sulfide inclusions in resulfurized steels of higher carbon contents. (a) and (b) 0.15% C carburizing steel, resulfurized (0.16C-0.25Si-1.10Mn-0.09S-0.028P, wt%). Hot-rolled bar. 170 HV. (a) Picral. 100×. (b) Picral. 500×. (c) and (d More
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Published: 01 August 1999
Fig. 6.12 (Part 1) Deformation effects in cementite particles and nonmetallic inclusions. Tensile stress axis is horizontal. (a) and (b) 0.4% C, spheroidized (0.40C-0.24Si-0.64Mn, wt%). Necked region of tensile testpiece. (a) 2% nital. 2000×. (b) Scanning electron micrograph. 2% nital More
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Published: 01 August 1999
Fig. 6.17 (Part 1) Manganese sulfide inclusions in cast steels. (a) and (b) 0.15% C (0.14C-0.29Si-0.31Mn-0.001 Al, wt%). As cast; incompletely deoxidized with silicon alone. Etchant: nil. (a) 200×. (b) Scanning electron micrograph of fracture surface. 500×. (c) 0.15% C (0.13C-0.22Si More
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Published: 01 March 2006
Fig. 2 Manganese sulfide inclusions in resulfurized free-machining steel. Unetched (as-polished). Original magnification: 500×. Source: Ref 6 More
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Published: 01 March 2002
Fig. 6.19 A SEM secondary electron micrograph of a fractured steel bar. Inclusions can be seen in many of the voids. 1000× More
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Published: 01 September 2008
Fig. 32 Concentration of inclusions near the fatigue crack site. (a) SEM image with secondary electrons. (b) Backscattered electrons More
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Published: 01 September 2008
Fig. 38 Alignment of the elongated inclusions (oriented in the longitudinal direction of the part) act as an easy propagation path in the 52100 steel axle. The main fracture direction, that is, longitudinal, corresponds exactly to the elongation and inclusion alignments. The arrows point More
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Published: 01 September 2008
Fig. 70 Model of fatigue crack initiation due to the presence of inclusions in a nonmartensitic (decarburized) steel layer. Source: Ref 122 More
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Published: 01 September 2008
Fig. 36 (a) Representative view of large slag-type inclusions observed throughout the sample cross sections. Unetched. Original magnification: 100×. (b) View of the crack profile and slag-type inclusions observed adjacent to the cracking. Unetched. Original magnification: 100× More
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Published: 01 September 2008
Fig. 43 Aspect of the stringer inclusions observed within the pin tip location. Unetched. Original magnification: 100× More
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Published: 01 January 2017
Fig. 3.35 Scanning electron micrograph of fracture area near large sulfide inclusions for AISI 4340 steel. Grain size, 90 μm More