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impact strength

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Published: 01 November 2007
Fig. 12.5 Impact strength and percent reduction in area for austempered steels (open bars) compared to quenched and tempered steels (solid bars) with carbon levels of 0.74, 0.78, and 0.85%. Impact test on unnotched Charpy 7 mm (0.28 in.) rod. Source: Ref 12.10 More
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Published: 01 November 2007
Fig. 12.8 Hardness and impact strength of 52100 steel versus hold time at M s prior to quenching. The percent bainite goes from 0 to 100% as time goes from 1 to 60 min. Copyright: American Metal Market More
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Published: 31 December 2020
Fig. 9 Relationship between impact strength and hardness of 0.74% C steel that has been conventionally quenched and tempered and one that has been austempered More
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Published: 31 December 2020
Fig. 16 Time-temperature exposures required for a 50% reduction in impact strength due to isothermal precipitation of undesirable secondary phases for various duplex stainless steels. Source: Ref 10 More
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Published: 01 November 2012
Fig. 37 Izod impact strength as a function of temperature for polystyrene (PS) and high-impact polystyrene (HIPS) thermoplastics. Source: Ref 33 More
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Published: 01 January 2015
Fig. 3.14 Effect of hydrogen on impact strength. Small additions of the beta stabilizer molybdenum and the alpha stabilizer aluminum increase the tolerance for hydrogen at room temperature. Note that unalloyed titanium is embrittled severely by hydrogen. More
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Published: 01 June 2007
Fig. 7.7 Impact strength of three ferritic stainless steels as a function of sintering temperature and sintered density. Sintering atmosphere was hydrogen, and sintering time was 30 min. Source: Ref 16 . Reprinted with permission from MPIF, Metal Powder Industries Federation, Princeton, NJ More
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Published: 01 August 2005
Fig. 2.28 Effect of impurity elements on the impact strength of joints made in mild steel using an Ag-Cu-Zn-Cd filler alloy. Adapted from Boughton and Sloboda [1970] More
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Published: 01 January 1998
Fig. 10-8 Unnotched Izod impact strength as a function of tempered hardness level for O-type tool steels. Note that in the usual working hardness range (57 to 64 HRC), type O1 has the highest impact strength. Data from Allegheny Ludlum Industries Curve Type Composition, % Hardening More
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Published: 01 January 1998
Fig. 10-10 Effect of tempering temperature on torsion impact strength of O2 tool steel containing 1.60% Mn. AQ, as quenched. Source: Ref 4 More
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Published: 01 January 1998
Fig. 11-12 Unnotched Izod impact strength as a function of tempered hardness for A2 steel hardened from 955 °C (1750 °F) and A5 (A4 with 3% Mn) steel hardened from 815 °C (1500 °F). Specimens were tempered for 1 h to indicated hardness levels. Data from Allegheny Ludlum Industries More
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Published: 01 January 1998
Fig. 14-43 Hardness and unnotched Izod impact strength as a function of tempering temperature for (a) T1 high-speed steel austenitized at 1290 °C (2350 °F) and (b) M2 high-speed steel austenitized at 1220 °C (2225 °F). Source: Ref 41 More
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Published: 01 January 1998
Fig. 14-44 Impact strength as measured by unnotched Izod testing versus hardness for (a) T1 high-speed steel hardened from various temperatures and (b) M2 high-speed steel hardened from 1190 and 1220 °C (2175 and 2225 °F). Source: Ref 41 More
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Published: 01 January 1998
Fig. 14-45 Unnotched Izod impact strength versus hardness for several high-speed steels. The steels and their austenitizing temperatures are as follows: T1, 1315 °C (2400 °F); M2, 1220 °C (2225 °F); M10, 1220 °C (2225 °F); M1, 1220 °C (2225 °F); M4, 1220 °C (2225 °F); T15, 1250 °C (2285 °F More
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Published: 01 January 2015
Fig. 10.23 Increased impact strength can be attained in Ti-6Al-4V by forging above the beta transus. Heat treatment: 940 °C (1725 °F) for 1 h, water quenched (565 °C, or 1050 °F) for 1.5 h; air cooled. More
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Published: 01 October 2012
Fig. 7.11 Effect of glass addition on impact strength. PC, polycarbonate; PBT, polybutylene terephthalate. Source: Ref 7.2 More
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Published: 01 August 2005
Fig. 7.25 Izod impact strength as a function of temperature for PS and HIPS thermoplastics. Source: Ref 7.33 More
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Published: 01 December 2008
Fig. 6 Variation of impact strength with temperature for (a) austenitic, (b) duplex, and (c) ferritic stainless steels More
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Published: 01 December 2001
Fig. 1 The effect of high aluminum content on the impact strength of Alloy 3 (see Table 1 ). Source: Ref 2 More
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Published: 01 June 2008
Fig. 20.5 Effect of manganese content (in wt%) on Charpy V-notch impact strength. Source: Ref 5 More