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impact fracture

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Published: 01 November 2012
Fig. 30 Correlation of plane-strain impact fracture toughness and impact Charpy V-notch energy absorption for various grades of steel. Source: Ref 3 More
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Published: 01 November 2012
Fig. 31 Correlation of plane-strain impact fracture toughness and impact Charpy V-notch energy absorption for SA 533B, class 1, steel. NDT, nil-ductility transition. Source: Ref 3 More
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Published: 01 December 1999
Fig. 7.19 Relationship between impact-fracture stress and compressive-residual stress (percent values indicate maximum amount of retained austenite content in the carburized case). Source: Ref 31 More
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Published: 01 August 2005
Fig. 2.37 Quasi-cleavage in the surface of an impact fracture in a specimen of 4340 steel. The same area is shown in both SEM fractographs, but at different magnifications. The small cleavage facets in martensite platelets contain river patterns and are separated by tear ridges. Shallow More
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Published: 01 September 2005
Fig. 27 Test specimen used by Cameron for fatigue, bend, and impact fracture tests. Typical results are shown in Fig. 28 and 29 . Source: Ref 61 More
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Published: 01 September 2005
Fig. 28 Effect of core carbon content and alloy content on impact fracture strength of a series of steels, carburized at 925 °C (1700 °F), cooled to 840 °C (1550 °F), oil quenched, and tempered at 150 °C (340 °F). Source: Ref 61 SAE (DIN) steel grade Composition, wt % C Mb Ni More
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Published: 01 September 2005
Fig. 29 Impact fracture strength of carburized steels containing various combinations of molybdenum and nickel. Open data points are for vacuum-melted heats; solid data points are for air-melted heats. Compositions were those of standard steels to which molybdenum was added in varying amounts More
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Published: 01 December 1996
Fig. 5-62 Impact curves and % of fracture surface showing fibrous (ductile) fracture of a 3140 steel for different aging times at 500 °C. The samples were austenitized for one hour at 900 °C, water quenched, tempered for one hour at 675 °C, water quenched, then aged at 500 °C for the times More
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Published: 01 June 1985
Fig. 4-35. Tooth bending impact with stress-coat overlay, showing fracture path short-circuiting the usual stress flow-lines. More
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Published: 01 August 2018
Fig. 14.21 Cross section transverse to the fracture surface of ISO-V impact specimen tested at −100 °C (−150 °F), steel ASTM A533 Cl.1. The fracture changes direction at the prior-austenitic grain boundaries. To make possible the observation of the region close to the fracture surface without More
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Published: 01 September 2008
Fig. 6 Fracture surfaces of SAE 4140 impact testpieces. Tested at room temperature, right, and at –196°C, left More
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Published: 01 December 2003
Fig. 18 Fracture initiation region of polycarbonate specimen after Izod impact showing mirror zone and mist region. 27× More
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Published: 01 November 2012
Fig. 41 Fracture surface of a polycarbonate specimen after Izod impact showing the mirror, mist, and hackle regions, along with Wallner lines that spread over the mist and hackle regions. Original magnification: 41×. Source: Ref 17 More
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Published: 01 November 2010
Fig. 11.9 Interlayer strain and fracture after impact of a toughened thermosetting-matrix composite. Transmitted polarized light, full wave plate, 40× objective More
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Published: 01 December 1996
Fig. 5-56 Fractographs of the fracture surface of impact samples of some tempered steels. (From M. Sarikaya, A.K. Jhingan, and G. Thomas, Met Trans ., Vol 14A, p 1121 (1983), Ref 27 ) More
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Published: 01 August 2005
Fig. 4.33 Fracture toughness transition behavior of steel under static and impact loading. Source: Ref 4.36 More
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Published: 01 August 2005
Fig. 7.30 Fracture surface of a PC specimen after Izod impact showing the mirror, mist, and hackle regions, along with Wallner lines that spread over the mist and hackle regions. Magnification: 41×. Source: Ref 7.16 More
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Published: 01 December 1999
Fig. 8.33 Influence of shot peening on (a) residual stresses within austenite and martensite of a case-hardened surface and (b) fatigue strength. Table shows influence of shot peening on impact fracture stress. Source: Ref 38 Steel Condition Surface hardness (a) , HRC Core hardness More
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1998
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.ts5.t65900165
EISBN: 978-1-62708-358-4
... Abstract The shock-resisting tool steels, designated as group S steels in the AISI classification system, have been developed to produce good combinations of high hardness, high strength, and high toughness or impact fracture resistance. This chapter describes the alloying effects of silicon...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 September 2005
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.gmpm.t51250257
EISBN: 978-1-62708-345-4
... of various fatigue failures. Then, it provides information on the modes of impact fractures, wear, scuffing, and stress rupture. Next, the chapter describes the causes of gear failures and discusses the processes involved in conducting the failure analysis. Finally, the chapter presents examples of gear...