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hydrogen solubility

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Published: 01 August 2018
Fig. 10.8 Hydrogen solubility in iron at 1 atm as a function of temperature. Solubility in austenite is substantially higher than in ferrite. The maximum solubility happens in the liquid phase. Source: Ref 9 More
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Published: 01 January 2015
Fig. 19.28 Hydrogen solubility in iron as a function of temperature and crystal structure at one atmosphere pressure of hydrogen. Source: Ref 19.93 More
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Published: 01 July 1997
Fig. 9 Hydrogen solubility in pure aluminum More
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Published: 01 December 2004
Fig. 5.1 Solubility of hydrogen in aluminum at 1 atm hydrogen pressure More
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Published: 01 July 2009
Fig. 23.9 Solubility of hydrogen in aluminum at atmospheric pressure. Source: Barker More
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Published: 01 March 2012
Fig. B.12 Maximum solubility of hydrogen in nickel and iron. Source: Ref B.6 as published in Ref B.2 More
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Published: 01 June 2008
Fig. 26.11 Solubility of hydrogen in aluminum. Source: Ref 13 More
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Published: 01 June 2008
Fig. 7.13 Maximum solubility of hydrogen in nickel and iron at H 2 pressure = 1 atm. Source: Ref 7 More
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Published: 01 October 2012
Fig. 2.27 Solubility of hydrogen in aluminum. Source: Ref 2.22 More
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Published: 01 July 1997
Fig. 1 Solubility of hydrogen in steel as a function of temperature More
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Published: 01 December 1995
Fig. 14-1 Hydrogen and nitrogen solubility in iron More
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Published: 01 January 2015
Fig. 3.13 The titanium-hydrogen phase diagram. Hydrogen is substantially soluble in the beta phase but essentially insoluble in the alpha phase at room temperature. More
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2004
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.aacppa.t51140047
EISBN: 978-1-62708-335-5
... and mechanical properties. 5.1 Hydrogen Porosity Hydrogen is the only gas that is appreciably soluble in aluminum and its alloys. The solubility of hydrogen in aluminum varies directly with temperature and the square root of pressure; solubility increases rapidly with increasing temperature above...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 July 1997
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.wip.t65930283
EISBN: 978-1-62708-359-1
... properties that affect welding, namely oxide characteristics; the solubility of hydrogen in molten aluminum; and its thermal, electrical, and nonmagnetic characteristics. The article addresses the primary factors commonly considered when selecting a welding filler alloy, namely ease of welding or freedom...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2004
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.aacppa.t51140055
EISBN: 978-1-62708-335-5
... the collapse and healing of void surfaces formed by hydrogen precipitation during solidification. At elevated temperatures and under increased pressure, precipitated hydrogen in excess of the solubility limit is compressed and repartitioned, or redistributed, resulting in increased structural density...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2015
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.spsp2.t54410439
EISBN: 978-1-62708-265-5
... shortness associated with copper and overheating and burning as occur during forging. It addresses various types of embrittlement, including quench embrittlement, tempered-martensite embrittlement, liquid-metal-induced embrittlement, and hydrogen embrittlement, and concludes with a discussion on high...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2015
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.tpmpa.t54480051
EISBN: 978-1-62708-318-8
... several important features ( Ref 3.3 ). The addition of hydrogen lowers the beta transus to the eutectoid temperature of approximately 300 °C (570 °F). Most important is the solubility of hydrogen in titanium. At low temperatures, the phase diagram shows no solubility of hydrogen in alpha; thus...
Book Chapter

Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2015
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.cpi2.t55030148
EISBN: 978-1-62708-282-2
... cooling 2 to 8 × 10 6 MPa (30–125 ksi) at 20–100 °C (70–210 °F) 1–10 ppm hydrogen content (iron at 20 °C, or 70 °F) up to 10 2 MPa (15 ksi) gaseous hydrogen (various metals, T > 0.5 melting point) 0.1 to 10 2 MPa (15–15,000 psi) gas pressure hydrogen activity must exceed solubility limit near 20...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 September 2008
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.fahtsc.t51130503
EISBN: 978-1-62708-284-6
... between atoms in the iron lattice are reduced in proportion to the interstitial hydrogen concentration. This theory provides for the observed increase in hydrogen solubility at the tip of a crack (Ref 30) . Diffusible hydrogen has the additional effect of supplying internal mechanical stresses...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2000
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.cub.t66910021
EISBN: 978-1-62708-250-1
... hydroxide produces a large number of hydroxyl ions, and sodium chloride produces only sodium ions and chloride ions, that is, neither hydrogen ions nor hydroxyl ions. Solubility Solubility is a measure...