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Book Chapter

Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2015
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.cpi2.t55030148
EISBN: 978-1-62708-282-2
... Abstract Hydrogen damage is a form of environmentally assisted failure that results most often from the combined action of hydrogen and residual or applied tensile stress. This chapter classifies the various forms of hydrogen damage, summarizes the various theories that seek to explain hydrogen...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 November 2007
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.htcma.t52080147
EISBN: 978-1-62708-304-1
... stability diagrams. It provides an extensive amount of high-temperature corrosion data for metals and alloys in gaseous environments containing chlorine and hydrogen chloride; fluorine and hydrogen fluoride; bromine and hydrogen bromide; and iodine and hydrogen iodide. halogen gases high-temperature...
Book Chapter

Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 November 2007
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.htcma.t52080437
EISBN: 978-1-62708-304-1
... Abstract Carbon and low-alloy steels in high-temperature service are vulnerable to the effects of hydrogen attack, which include severe loss in tensile and rupture strengths as well as ductility. As the chapter explains, when steel is in contact with hydrogen molecules at elevated temperatures...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 1989
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.dmlahtc.t60490329
EISBN: 978-1-62708-340-9
... strengths; (2) notch toughness at the lowest operating temperature; and (3) weldability. In addition to the minimum code requirements for the fabricated condition, steels for high-temperature, high-pressure hydrogenation service are required to withstand such environmental-degradation processes as temper...
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Published: 01 September 2008
Fig. 5 Effect of hydrogen content on hydrogen-assisted cracking (HAC) for microvoid coalescence (MVC), quasi-cleavage (QC), and intergranular (IG) fracture modes. Adapted from Beachem. Source: Ref 32 More
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Published: 01 January 2015
Fig. 19.35 Hydrogen desorption as a function of temperature for hydrogen-charged medium-carbon steel alloyed with titanium and quench and tempered at various temperatures. Source: Ref 19.109 More
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Published: 01 December 2015
Fig. 23 Effect of hydrogen and combined carbon, nitrogen, or oxygen and hydrogen on the temperature dependence of ductility in vanadium. Source: Ref 36 More
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Published: 01 July 2000
Fig. 2.8 Dependence of hydrogen-reaction equilibrium potential on hydrogen-gas partial pressure More
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Published: 01 December 1989
Fig. 7.14. Safe hydrogen concentration to avoid hydrogen-crack growth below 150 °C (300 °F), assuming a crack 25 mm (1 in.) deep and a stress equal to one-third of the yield strength ( Ref 4 ). More
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Published: 01 December 2004
Fig. 5.1 Solubility of hydrogen in aluminum at 1 atm hydrogen pressure More
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Published: 01 January 2015
Fig. 3.13 The titanium-hydrogen phase diagram. Hydrogen is substantially soluble in the beta phase but essentially insoluble in the alpha phase at room temperature. More
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Published: 30 November 2023
Fig. 7.22 Nitrogen gas bubbles floating hydrogen bubbles More
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Published: 30 June 2023
Fig. 4.5 Degassing. (a) Degassing process used for hydrogen removal during molten metal processing. (b) Adsorption of hydrogen by gas bubbles during degassing More
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Published: 30 June 2023
Fig. 5.11 Hydrogen content, pore size, and cooling rate relationships in Al-4Mg alloy. Source: Ref 5.5 More
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Published: 30 September 2023
Figure 6.2: Structures of selected hydrocarbons. Note that the hydrogen atoms are generally omitted in this representation. More
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Published: 01 January 2000
Fig. 64 Hydrogen embrittlement failure of a 300 M steel space shuttle orbiter nose landing gear steering collar pin. The pin was heat treated to a 1895-MPa (275 ksi) strength level. The part was plated with chromium and titanium-cadmium. (a) Pin showing location of failure (actual size). (b More
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Published: 01 January 2000
Fig. 65 Hydrogen-induced blistering in a 9.5 mm (⅜ in.) thick carbon steel (ASTM A 285 Grade C) plate that had been in service 1 year in a refinery vessel. 1½× More
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Published: 01 January 2000
Fig. 66 Stepwise cracking of a low-strength pipeline steel exposed to hydrogen sulfide (H 2 S). 6× More
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Published: 01 January 2000
Fig. 19 Hydrogen grooving of a 75 mm (3 in.) diameter steel elbow. The elbow was sectioned; the top half is shown. More
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Published: 01 January 2000
Fig. 20 Hydrogen grooving on the sidewall of an H 2 SO 4 storage tank More