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hot working

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Book Chapter

Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 August 2018
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.msisep.t59220353
EISBN: 978-1-62708-259-4
... Abstract This chapter discusses the effects of hot working on the structure and properties of steel. It explains how working steels at high temperatures promotes diffusion, which helps close cavities and pores, and how it changes the shape and distribution of segregates, offsetting their effect...
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Published: 01 October 2011
Fig. 6.6 Microstructural variations during (a) cold working and (b) hot working More
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Published: 01 December 2006
Fig. 7.118 Comparison of the hot strength and hot toughness of the hot working steels (a) 1.2343 and (b) 1.2567 [ Bar 81 ] More
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Published: 01 December 2006
Fig. 7.107 Comparison of the 0.2% hot proof stress of the hot working tool steel 1.2343 measured in hot tensile tests between 500 and 600 °C, with the 0.2% 100 h creep stress in the same temperature region [ Güm 81 ] More
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Published: 01 December 2006
Fig. 7.120 Time-dependent wear rates from hot torsion tests for the hot working steel 1.2779 as the rotating steel heated to 550 °C and the extruded materials AlMgSi0.5, CuZn42 and CuNi30 heated to the deformation temperature [ Schi 82 ] More
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Published: 01 December 2006
Fig. 7.128 Comparison of the 0.2% hot proof stress of the classic hot working steel 1.2344 with the austenitic hot working steel 1.2779 [ Kor 95 ] More
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Published: 01 August 2018
Fig. 9.45 Steel for hot working tools W.Nr 1.2365 (similar to AISI H10) with heterogeneous austenitic grain size. Martensitic structure with carbides, formed via heating to 1020 °C (1870 °F) for 0.5 h, transferred to another furnace at 700 °C (1290 °F) for 1 h air-cooled. Etchant: Villela More
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Published: 01 August 2018
Fig. 11.4 The effect of hot working on the macrostructure of a steel. (a) Dendritic structure in the original ingot. (b) Cross section after a reduction by hot working to 1/5 of the cross-sectional area. (c) Cross section after a reduction by hot working to 1/30 of the cross-sectional area. (d More
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Published: 01 August 2018
Fig. 11.34 The effect of hot working on the distribution of carbides in a high-speed steel. (a) As-cast material, with eutectic colonies, presenting carbides. (b) Carbides have been fragmented and redistributed as an effect of hot working. (c) Carbide distribution improves with the increase More
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Published: 01 August 2018
Fig. 11.41 Schematic presentation of the microstructure evolution during hot working (hot rolling in the example). Two possibilities are illustrated; when the recrystallization starts while the material is still suffering hot working, it is called dynamic recrystallization. Static More
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Published: 01 August 2018
Fig. 11.43 The influence of the degree of deformation during hot working on the average austenitic grain size for two original ingot structures. Steel containing C = 0.11%, Mn = 0.62%, Ni = 3.7%, Cr = 0.25%, and Mo = 0.18%. Source: Ref 26 More
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Published: 01 August 2018
Fig. 11.46 Hot working with phase transformation on cooling. (a) Conventional: while the structure is controlled during hot working following adequate combinations of temperature and deformation, the final properties of the part are defined in a heat treatment performed afterward. (b More
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Published: 01 December 2006
Fig. 4.46 Strain-rate dependence in hot working (stress-strain curves of nickel) [ San 75 ] More
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Published: 01 December 2006
Fig. 5.12 Increase in the flow stress of aluminum in hot working with different alloying additions [ Ake 70 ] More
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Published: 01 December 2006
Fig. 7.110 Tempering curves for different secondary age-hardening hot working steels, primarily CrMo alloyed. The hot working steels 1.2603 and 1.2606 are rarely used for extrusion tools. (The points on the curves were taken from various literature references.) More
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Published: 01 December 2006
Fig. 7.111 Dependence of the creep strength of various hot working steels on the testing temperature at various heat treated strengths [ Güm 81 ] More
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Published: 01 December 2006
Fig. 7.112 Creep behavior of the hot working steel 1.2343 under different loads and creep rates as a function of creep elongation. The diagram shows the three creep phases: primary creep, secondary creep, and tertiary creep [ Ber 76 ] More
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Published: 01 December 2006
Fig. 7.113 Creep elongation curves for the hot working steels 1.2714, 1.2343, 1.2567, and 1.2886. The different steels exhibit ductile and brittle creep behavior [ Ber 76 ] More
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Published: 01 December 2006
Fig. 7.114 Dependence of the creep behavior of the hot working steel 1.2365 on its heat treated strength [ Ber 76 ] More
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Published: 01 December 2006
Fig. 7.116 Notched bar impact values for the hot working steel 1.2344 as a function of its tensile strength [ Hab 81 ] More