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high-speed steel

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Published: 01 January 1998
Fig. 3-4 Macroetch quality of high-carbon sulfurized M2-type high-speed steel produced conventionally and by electroflux remelting. (a) From static cast 350 mm (14 in.) square ingot. Disks hardened and tempered. (b) and (c) From electroflux remelted 400 mm (16 in.) diam ingot. Polished More
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Published: 01 December 1995
Fig. 26-5 Tool life of high-speed steel tools for 0.30% cast carbon steel More
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Published: 01 December 1995
Fig. 26-6 Tool life of high-speed steel tools for cast 0.30% carbon steel More
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Published: 01 January 2015
Fig. 24.8 Feathery, herringbone, and MC eutectics in M2 high-speed steel. (a) Light micrograph. KMnO 4 etch. (b) Microradiograph of same area. Chromium radiation. Courtesy of R.H. Barkalow and R.W. Kraft, Lehigh University, Bethlehem, PA. Source: Ref 24.27 More
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Published: 01 October 2011
Fig. 11.1 Comparison of the red hardness of cobalt-bearing grades of high-speed steel (M33, M36, and T15) vs. that of non-cobalt-bearing grades (M1, M2, M4, M7, and T1). Source: Ref 11.8 More
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Published: 01 October 2011
Fig. 11.2 Effect of cobalt content on the red hardness of T1 high-speed steel. Source: Ref 11.8 More
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Published: 01 October 2011
Fig. 11.6 Carbide dissolution in an M4 high-speed steel. Source: Ref 11.11 More
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Published: 01 October 2011
Fig. 11.9 Comparison of the microstructures of a powder metallurgy high-speed steel and its conventionally manufactured wrought counterpart. Note the dramatic difference in the carbide size, shape and distribution in these two alloys. Source: Ref 11.9 More
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Published: 01 May 2018
FIG. 6.5 A typical lathe before the use of high-speed steel. The lightweight lathe had to be replaced to withstand the heavy cuts now possible with high-speed steel tools. More
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Published: 01 May 2018
FIG. 6.6 Tools made with 18-4-1 high-speed steel. More
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Published: 01 May 2018
FIG. 6.7 A high-speed steel tempering curve showing the hardness peak at Rockwell 65. More
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Published: 01 December 2001
Fig. 2 Effect of cobalt content on the hot hardness of T1 high-speed steel. Initial hardness of 66 HRC at different testing temperatures. Source: Ref 3 More
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Published: 01 December 2001
Fig. 5 Graphical comparison of high-speed steel properties More
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Published: 01 January 1998
Fig. 14-1 Phase diagram for T1 -type high-speed steel based on 18W-4Cr section through the quaternary Fe-W-Cr-C system. Source: Ref 1 , based on work from Ref 2 to 5 More
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Published: 01 January 1998
Fig. 14-2 Phase diagram for M2-type high-speed steel based on the 6W-5Mo-4Cr-2V section through the Fe-W-Mo-Cr-V-C system. C, carbide. Source: Ref 1 , based on work from Ref 6 More
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Published: 01 January 1998
Fig. 14-4 Feathery, herringbone, and MC eutectics in M2 high-speed steel. (a) Light micrograph, KMn0 4 etch, (b) Microradiograph of same area. Source: Ref 7 More
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Published: 01 January 1998
Fig. 14-5 Microstructure of high-speed steel showing alteration in carbide aggregates caused by forging. (a) Longitudinal microstructure after moderate reduction. (b) Longitudinal microstructure after modre severe reduction More
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Published: 01 January 1998
Fig. 14-7 Microstructure of annealed M2 high-speed steel. 2000x. (a) Etched electrolytically in 1 % chromic acid, 3 V. 1.7% MC. (b) As (a) and etched in 4% NaOH saturated with KMnO 4 . 1.7% MC plus 13.0% M 6 C. (c) As (b) and etched in 1 % nital. 1.7% MC plus 13.0% M 6 C plus 8.5% M 23 C 6 More
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Published: 01 January 1998
Fig. 14-9 Microstructure of quenched T1 high-speed steel. (a) Quenched in oil from 870 °C (1600 °F); underheated. Nital etch, 500x. (b) Quenched in oil from 1260 °C (2300 °F); typical hardened microstructure showing prior-austenite grain size and carbides. Nital etch, 500x. (c) Quenched from More
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Published: 01 January 1998
Fig. 14-10 Effect of austenitizing temperature on grain size of T6 high-speed steel. Light micrographs, 300x. (a) 1260 °C (2300 °F); grain size, 18. (b) 1290 °C (2350 °F); grain size, 14. (c) 1300 °C (2375 °F); grain size, 10; (d) 1315 °C (2400 °F); grain size, 6 More