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high-carbon steel

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Published: 01 August 2018
Fig. 10.76 Forge weld region of a steel hoe blade. High carbon steel (to the right) welded to low carbon steel (to the left). Region not quenched. Microstructure is pearlite in the right side and ferrite and pearlite in the left side. Etchant: nital. More
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Published: 01 August 2018
Fig. 10.77 Forge weld region of a steel hoe blade. High carbon steel (to the right) welded to low carbon steel (to the left). Quenched region. Martensite and elongated nonmetallic inclusions (to the right) and ferrite, acicular ferrite and martensite (to the left). Etchant: nital. More
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Published: 01 August 1999
Fig. 8.1 Austenitization of a high-carbon steel. Original structure: ferrite and spheroidized cementite. The dark-etching areas were austenitic prior to quenching. The mid-tone areas are cementite. The lightest areas are ferrite. (a) Unheated. Picral. 1500×. (b) Heated at 745 °C for 5 s More
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Published: 01 August 2018
Fig. 10.55 High carbon steel quenched after overheating in the austenitic single phase field. Very coarse martensite. Etchant: nital. More
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Published: 31 December 2020
Fig. 19 Phase changes taking place in the tempering of a high-carbon steel More
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Published: 01 October 2011
Fig. 8.3 Spark patterns used to identify low-, medium-, and high-carbon steels. (a) Sparks from 1015 steel (0.15% C). (b) Sparks from 1045 steel (0.45% C). (c) Sparks from 1095 steel (1.0% C) More
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Published: 01 January 1998
Fig. 5-29 Multiplying factors for alloying elements in high-carbon steels quenched from 830 °C (1525 °F). See text for discussion of Si*. Source: Ref 50 More
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Published: 01 January 1998
Fig. 5-30 Multiplying factors for alloying elements in high-carbon steels quenched from 927 °C (1700 °F). See text for discussion of Si*. Source: Ref 50 More
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2015
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.spsp2.t54410315
EISBN: 978-1-62708-265-5
... is a TEM micrograph showing the pearlitic microstructure in a high-carbon steel rail. The interlamellar spacing between the ferrite and cementite phases is quite fine; regions where the lamellae are parallel or almost parallel are referred to as colonies. This remarkable composite structure of ductile...
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Published: 01 August 1999
Fig. 5.12 (Part 1) Higher-strength grade of HSLA hot-rolled steel strip. High carbon, high manganese, microalloys: niobium and vanadium. 0.085C-0.19Si-1.42Mn-0.003M0-0.045Nb-0.003Ti-0.038V-0.001S-0.015P (wt%). 220 HV. (a) Quarter-thickness region. Nital. 100×. (b) Quarter-thickness region More
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Published: 01 January 1998
Fig. 3-4 Macroetch quality of high-carbon sulfurized M2-type high-speed steel produced conventionally and by electroflux remelting. (a) From static cast 350 mm (14 in.) square ingot. Disks hardened and tempered. (b) and (c) From electroflux remelted 400 mm (16 in.) diam ingot. Polished More
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Published: 01 January 1998
Fig. 17-20 Grinding damage on a high-carbon, high-chromium tool steel slitter knife that spalled in service More
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Published: 01 December 1995
Fig. 26-5 Tool life of high-speed steel tools for 0.30% cast carbon steel More
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Published: 01 December 1995
Fig. 26-6 Tool life of high-speed steel tools for cast 0.30% carbon steel More
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Published: 01 November 2007
Fig. 3.7 Oxidation of carbon steel and high-strength low-alloy (HSLA) steel in air. Source: Ref 13 , reproduced from Ref 14 More
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Published: 01 December 2015
Fig. 3 Oxidation of carbon steel and high-strength low-alloy (HSLA) steel in air. Source: Ref 2 More
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Published: 01 August 1999
Fig. 5.10 Lower strength grade of HSLA hot-rolled steel strip. High carbon, low manganese, microalloys: niobium and vanadium. 0.085C-0.20Si-1.06Mn-0.003M0-0.022Nb-0.004Ti-0.017V-0.001S-0.014P (wt%). 185 HV. (a) Quarter-thickness region. Nital. 100×. (b) Quarter-thickness region. Nital More
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Published: 01 March 2002
Fig. 1.2(c) Micrograph of high-carbon AISI/SAE 1095 steel showing a matrix of pearlite and some grain-boundary cementite. Etched in 4% picral. 500× More
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Published: 01 January 1998
Fig. 8-15 Length changes on tempering a high-carbon L2 tool steel. Tempering time is considered to begin 1.5 h after quenching. Source: Ref 13 More
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Published: 01 January 1998
Fig. 14-51 Master tempering curves for T1 high-speed steel at five different carbon levels (see steels A to E in Fig. 14-50 ). Hardened from 1205 °C (2200 °F), tempering times of 5 h. Source: Ref 23 More