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high-alloy steel

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Published: 01 January 2022
Fig. 12.66 Feeding distance for a high-alloy steel CF-8M compared with AISI 1025 steel; D R , diameter of the riser or feeder; FD, feeding distance. Source: Ref 27 More
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Published: 01 January 2022
Fig. 3.27 Mold stripping times for high alloy steel castings More
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Published: 01 December 1995
Opening image for Chapter 20, “Corrosion-Resistant High Alloy SteelsMore
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 1995
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.sch6.t68200274
EISBN: 978-1-62708-354-6
... Abstract This chapter describes the definitions, designation, chemical composition, room-temperature properties, elevated-temperature properties, and corrosion resistance of cast high alloy steels and stainless steels. In addition, the corrosion resistance of cast corrosion-resistant alloys...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 1995
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.sch6.t68200298
EISBN: 978-1-62708-354-6
... Abstract This chapter provides a detailed discussion on the definitions, alloy classification, alloy selection, mechanical properties, hot gas corrosion resistance, and formability of heat-resistant high alloy steels. In addition, the applications of cast heat-resistant alloys are also...
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Published: 01 November 2007
Fig. 3.7 Oxidation of carbon steel and high-strength low-alloy (HSLA) steel in air. Source: Ref 13 , reproduced from Ref 14 More
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Published: 01 December 2015
Fig. 3 Oxidation of carbon steel and high-strength low-alloy (HSLA) steel in air. Source: Ref 2 More
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Published: 01 December 1995
Fig. 2-92 U-bend castings of high alloy HK cast steel More
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Published: 01 December 1995
Fig. 2-116 Grate bar produced from high alloy (HD) cast steel. Weight 73 lb (33 kg) More
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Published: 01 September 2005
Fig. 13 P/M transfer gear made of high-strength low-alloy steel. (a) Original P/M processing technique, which required machining of flange section. (b) Modified P/M technique, which required no additional machining More
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Published: 01 June 2008
Fig. 20.13 Fine grain size in high-strength low-alloy (HSLA) steel. Source: Ref 14 More
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Published: 01 December 1995
Fig. 27-2 Variation of Poisson’s ratio, shear modulus, and modulus of elasticity with temperature for wrought carbon, low alloy, and high alloy steels. For high alloy steels the nearest cast steel designations are used in this figure to indicate the type of alloy stee ( 9 ). More
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 1995
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.sch6.t68200369
EISBN: 978-1-62708-354-6
... Abstract This chapter covers the basics of weldability of cast steels such as carbon and low alloy steels, corrosion-resistant high alloy steels, nickel-base alloys, heat-resistant high alloy steels, and wear-resistant high austenitic manganese steels. It provides an overview of weld overlay...
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Published: 01 September 2008
Fig. 26 Schematic of hardness after tempering and the effect of secondary hardening in high-alloy steels. Observe that high-temperature hardness is only possible through precipitation hardening caused by alloy carbides (secondary hardening). At low temperatures, hardness is less than More
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 1995
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.sch6.t68200311
EISBN: 978-1-62708-354-6
... Abstract This chapter defines low-temperature and cryogenic steels and describes their alloy classifications and their ambient and low-temperature properties. These steels include ferritic carbon and low alloy steels, martensitic low alloy steels, martensitic high alloy steels, and austenitic...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2022
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.isceg.t59320217
EISBN: 978-1-62708-332-4
... Abstract Steel is broadly classified as plain-carbon steels, low-alloy steels, and high-alloy steels. This chapter begins by describing microconstituents of low- and medium-carbon steel, including bainite and martensite. This is followed by a section discussing the effect of alloying elements...
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Published: 01 January 1998
Fig. 5-29 Multiplying factors for alloying elements in high-carbon steels quenched from 830 °C (1525 °F). See text for discussion of Si*. Source: Ref 50 More
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Published: 01 January 1998
Fig. 5-30 Multiplying factors for alloying elements in high-carbon steels quenched from 927 °C (1700 °F). See text for discussion of Si*. Source: Ref 50 More
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Published: 01 June 2008
Fig. 22.10 Relative hardness of alloy carbides in high-speed steels. Source: Ref 1 More
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Published: 01 December 2000
Fig. 5.3 Influence of tempering temperature on core hardness of some high alloy steels More