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heat transfer coefficient

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Published: 01 January 1998
Fig. 6-14 Heat-transfer coefficient, h , rises with the increase in velocity of the fluidized bed until a peak value, h max, is reached at the optimum velocity, V opt . Source: Ref 7 More
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Published: 01 August 2012
Fig. 3.16 Heat-transfer coefficient as a function of pressure. Source: Ref 3.23 More
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Published: 01 August 2012
Fig. 7.15 Experimental setup for finding heat-transfer coefficient. Source: Ref 7.13 More
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Published: 01 August 2012
Fig. 7.16 Heat-transfer coefficient as a function of pressure for both-sided metallic contact. Source: Ref 7.11 More
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Published: 01 August 2012
Fig. 7.17 Contact heat-transfer coefficient as a function of contact pressure and distance between tool and sheet material surface. Source: Ref 7.14 More
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Published: 01 December 1996
Fig. 9-3 Film heat transfer coefficient as a function of temperature for water cooling a Chromel C wire. (Adapted from E.A. Farber and R.L. Scorah, Trans. Am. Soc. Mech. Engrs ., Vol 70, p 369 (1948), Ref 2 ) More
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Published: 01 February 2005
Fig. 22.8 Heat-transfer coefficient and temperature changes in a typical hot forging operation (A, heated billet resting on lower die; B, contact time under pressure; C, forging removed from lower die; D, lubrication of die; E, dwell time with no billet on lower die before next cycle begins More
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Published: 31 December 2020
Fig. 14 Comparison of the heat-transfer coefficients achievable with different gas-quenching media for bulk-loading and single-component quenching Source: Ref 18 More
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Published: 01 January 1998
Fig. 6-11 Plot of surface-to-center temperature ratio vs. the heat-transfer coefficient, h , to show the effect of varying tool steel slug diameters ranging from 25 to 250 mm (1 to 10 in.). Source: Ref 4 More
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 February 2005
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.chffa.t51040059
EISBN: 978-1-62708-300-3
... deformation can all be calculated in a computer. To ensure accurate heat transfer calculation, correct workpiece and die interface heat transfer coefficient must be known. Using accurate process modeling, the influence of press speed, contact time, and heat transfer in metal forming can be evaluated. 6.2...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 August 2012
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.smfpa.t53500133
EISBN: 978-1-62708-317-1
... and heat transfer during hot stamping simulation. The friction coefficient under relevant conditions of hot stamping is calculated using a tribosimulator ( Ref 7.10 ) and the modified cup drawing test ( Ref 7.11 ). Figure 7.10 represents a schematic of the testing machine used for determining friction...
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Published: 01 February 2005
Fig. 6.8 Setup used in the ring test for the measurement of interface heat transfer coefficient. [ Burte et al., 1989 ] More
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Published: 01 August 2012
Fig. 5.36 Predicted thickness distribution comparison with various heat-transfer coefficients (HTC) (5 mm/s at 250 °C). LDR, limiting draw ratio. Source: Ref 5.31 More
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Published: 01 September 2008
Fig. 13 Centerline cooling curves for oil-quenched steel bars of varying section sizes, assuming a surface heat-transfer coefficient of 0.019 cal s –1 °C –1 cm 2 More
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Published: 01 January 1998
Fig. 6-6 Plot of temperature vs. time showing the effect of gas temperature and heat-transfer coefficient, h , the cooling of 25 mm (1 in.) diam steel slugs. Source: Ref 4 More
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Published: 01 December 2003
Fig. 2 Annealing time effects on differential scanning calorimetry traces of epoxy 828-0-0. Annealed at 23 °C (73 °F). H , convective heat-transfer coefficient. Source: Ref 39 More
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Published: 01 August 2012
Fig. 5.35 Comparison of punch load predictions using various heat-transfer coefficients (HTC = kW/m 2 • °C) with experiments (5 mm/s at 250 °C). LDR, limiting draw ratio. Source: Ref 5.31 More
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Published: 01 January 1998
Fig. 6-12 Plot of cooling rate at the center of the slug vs. the heat-transfer coefficient, h , of M2 tool steel to show the effect of varying diameters over the temperature range of 1200 to 600 °C (2190 to 1110 °F). Source: Ref 4 More
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 August 2012
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.smfpa.t53500083
EISBN: 978-1-62708-317-1
... Analysis of Warm Forming of Aluminum 5754-O Alloy To investigate the effect of the heat-transfer coefficients on the deep drawing process and to check the accuracy and applicability of those coefficients, an experimental case was selected to simulate the warm forming of an aluminum 5754-O sheet alloy...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1998
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.ts5.t65900109
EISBN: 978-1-62708-358-4
... (greater than 250 mm, or 10 in.). Both types of parameters must be taken into consideration. Gas Parameters The gas parameter constituent of heat removal is described by Eq 6-1 : (Eq 6-1) Q = h A ⋅ Δ T where Q is the heat removal rate, h is the heat transfer coefficient...