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heat resistance

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Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 1995
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.sch6.t68200298
EISBN: 978-1-62708-354-6
... Abstract This chapter provides a detailed discussion on the definitions, alloy classification, alloy selection, mechanical properties, hot gas corrosion resistance, and formability of heat-resistant high alloy steels. In addition, the applications of cast heat-resistant alloys are also...
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Published: 01 January 2022
Fig. 12.121 Chromium-nickel range diagram in corrosion-resistant and heat-resistant steel ( Ref 4 ) More
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Published: 01 March 2002
Fig. 5.36 (Part 1) Micrographs of a cast 25% Cr-12% Ni heat-resistant HH steel with grain-boundary carbides showing (a) an unfocused field diaphragm, (b) a focused field diaphragm, and (c) the focused field of view. When the field diaphragm is in focus, the field of view on the specimen More
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Published: 01 March 2002
Fig. 5.36 (Part 2) Micrographs of a cast 25% Cr-12% Ni heat-resistant HH steel with grain-boundary carbides showing (a) an unfocused field diaphragm, (b) a focused field diaphragm, and (c) the focused field of view. When the field diaphragm is in focus, the field of view on the specimen More
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Published: 01 December 2001
Fig. 12 Typical stress-rupture properties of high-nickel heat-resistant ductile irons. (a) At 595 °C (1100 °F). (b) At 705 °C (1300 °F). Source: Ref 9 More
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Published: 01 April 2013
Fig. 4 Sections through two heat-resistant alloy ingots showing flaws that can impair forgeability. (a) Piece of unmelted consumable electrode (white spot near center). (b) Shelf (black line along edge) resulting from uneven solidification of the ingot. Source: Ref 1 More
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Published: 01 April 2013
Fig. 5 Section through a heat-resistant alloy forging showing a central discontinuity that resulted from insufficient homogenization during conversion. Step machining was used to reveal the location of the rupture; original diameter is at right. Source: Ref 1 More
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Published: 01 December 1995
Fig. 10-24 Cast high-alloy heat-resistant reducer More
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Published: 01 December 1995
Fig. 22-10 Corrosion rates of cast heat-resistant alloys in reducing flue gases More
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Published: 01 September 2008
Fig. 31 Heat checking resistance (lower readings indicate higher resistance) as a function of unnotched impact toughness and hardness of H13 steel. Heat checking is evaluated by the photographs on the left; the rating is calculated by adding the column representing the largest cracks (leading More
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Published: 01 January 1998
Fig. 13-25 Heat-checking resistance (lower readings indicate higher resistance) as a function of unnotched impact toughness and hardness of H13 steel. Source: Ref 24 More
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Published: 01 December 2015
Fig. 42 Effect of welding heat input on the corrosion resistance of autogenous gas tungsten arc welds in Ferralium alloy 255 in 10% FeCl 3 at 10 °C (40 °F). The base metal was 25 mm (1 in.) thick. Source: Ref 16 More
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Published: 01 January 2017
Fig. 4.36 Effect of heat treatment on the resistance of type 304 (0.04% C) in polythionic acid and Strauss tests. After Ref 4.133 More
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Published: 01 June 1983
Figure 4.7 Resistance to electronic heat conduction: temperature dependencies and imperfection (defect) densities progressing from pure, annealed metals to highly alloyed metals. More
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Published: 01 December 2006
Fig. 10 Effect of welding heat input on the corrosion resistance of autogenous gas tungsten arc welds in Ferralium alloy 255 in 10% FeCl 3 at 10 °C (40 °F). The base metal was 25 mm (1 in.) thick. Source: Ref 20 More
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2001
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