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heat input

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Published: 01 December 2015
Fig. 42 Effect of welding heat input on the corrosion resistance of autogenous gas tungsten arc welds in Ferralium alloy 255 in 10% FeCl 3 at 10 °C (40 °F). The base metal was 25 mm (1 in.) thick. Source: Ref 16 More
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Published: 01 December 2006
Fig. 6 Influence of heat input on corrosion of welded S31803 steel in ferric chloride. Source: Ref 3 More
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Published: 01 December 2006
Fig. 10 Effect of welding heat input on the corrosion resistance of autogenous gas tungsten arc welds in Ferralium alloy 255 in 10% FeCl 3 at 10 °C (40 °F). The base metal was 25 mm (1 in.) thick. Source: Ref 20 More
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Published: 01 November 2011
Fig. 5.5 Schematic showing effect of heat input and welding speed variations on weld grain structure in gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW): (a) low heat input and low welding speed, producing an elliptical weld pool; (b) high heat input and high welding speed, producing a tear-drop shaped weld More
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2018
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.fibtca.t52430343
EISBN: 978-1-62708-253-2
... Abstract This chapter examines boiler tube failures attributed to operation-related causes. It discusses failures due to rapid start-ups, excessive load swing, excessive heat inputs, poor water chemistry control, and water-treatment methods. boiler tubes operation-related failures water...
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Published: 01 August 1999
Fig. 11.19 (Part 1) Effect of cooling rate on parent metal adjacent to weld. Butt weld in 19 mm normalized plate. 0.24C-1.59Mn (wt%) CE = 0.49. (a) Electroslag weld (30 kJ/mm heat input). 290 HV. Nital. 75×. (b) Submerged-arc weld (6 kJ/mm heat input). 425 HV. Nital. 75×. (c) Shielded More
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Published: 01 December 1984
Figure 1-23 Macroetching used to reveal the influence of weld parameters on penetration depth and shape. Top example shows GMA (gas-metal arc) welds at a heat input of 45 kJ/in using atmospheres of 100% CO 2 , argon plus 25% CO 2 , and argon plus 2% O 2 (left to right). Bottom example shows More
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 July 1997
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.wip.t65930217
EISBN: 978-1-62708-359-1
...), microstructures and morphologies become important. A wide range of microstructures can be developed based on cooling rates, and these microstructures depend on energy input, preheat, metal thickness (heat sink effects), weld bead size, and reheating effects due to multipass welding. Asa result of their different...
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Published: 01 July 1997
Fig. 17 Variation of hardness profiles in the heat-affected zone (HAZ) of thermomechanically controlled processed (TMCP) steel welded with various heat inputs. Chemical composition of steel: C, 0.06%; Si, 0.14%; Mn, 1.33%; P, 0.010%; S, 0.001%; Cu, 0.31%; Ni, 0.31 %; Cr, 0.05%; Nb, 0.015 More
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Published: 01 August 2018
Fig. 9.82 Cross section through the brittle fracture region of the heat-affected zone of a weld in a structural steel with 490 MPa (71 ksi) strength. Fracture close to the fusion line in an electrogas (high heat-input) weld. The large austenitic grain size and the layer of pro-eutectoid More
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Published: 01 November 2011
Fig. 5.4 Effect of travel speed on isotemperature contours of low-carbon steel for 4.2 kJ/s (1000 cal/s) heat input. Source: Ref 5.2 More
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Published: 01 July 1997
Fig. 18 Percent ductile fracture vs. test temperature for the submerged arc bead-in-groove welds deposited in HY-80 steel. The numbers 1 through 4 accompanying the alloy designation represent heat input levels in kJ/mm. Source: Ref 16 More
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Published: 01 July 1997
Fig. 19 Percent ductile fracture vs. test temperature for the submerged arc bead-in-groove welds deposited in high-strength low-alloy steel. The numbers 1 through 4 accompanying the alloy designation represent the heat input levels in kJ/mm. Source: Ref 16 More
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Published: 01 November 2011
Fig. 5.3 Effect of thermal properties on isotemperature contours (in °C) for a heat input of 4.2 kJ/s (1000 cal/s) at a travel speed of 5 mm/s (0.02 in./s) and the thermal conductivities of each material. Values on x- and y-axes are in centimeters and temperatures are in centigrade. Source More
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2006
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.cw.t51820099
EISBN: 978-1-62708-339-3
... ). Preheat Preheat is generally not recommended for duplex stainless steels, but may sometimes be specified in low-nitrogen grades, because thick sections and low heat input welding processes may, in combination, develop highly ferritic HAZs ( Ref 9 ). For the more highly alloyed duplex stainless steels...
Book Chapter

Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 July 1997
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.wip.t65930023
EISBN: 978-1-62708-359-1
..., process, filler metal, restraint level, heat input, preheat, PWHT Critical restraint, or % hindered contraction None Costly machining Slot test HAZ hydrogen cracking Filler metal, interpass time, preheat Time to crack, critical preheat None Low cost Rigid restraint (RRC) test Weld metal hot...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 July 1997
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.wip.t65930353
EISBN: 978-1-62708-359-1
...) is exceeded, then elongated grains result ( Ref 5 , 6 ). Increased energy input results in larger heat-affected zone (HAZ) grains and fewer nucleation sites for fusion zone grains ( Ref 2 ). There is an increase in hardness at the areas of metal deposition and at the HAZ in gas-tungsten arc welded...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2015
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.cpi2.t55030096
EISBN: 978-1-62708-282-2
... During the welding process, a number of important changes occur that can significantly affect the corrosion behavior of the weldment. Heat input and welder technique obviously play important roles. The way in which the weld solidifies is equally important to understanding how weldments may behave...
Book Chapter

Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2008
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.ssde.t52310201
EISBN: 978-1-62708-286-0
... and consequently lower corrosion resistance. Thus, the welds have lower resistance to localized corrosion. This is addressed by using more highly alloyed filler metal or by solution annealing the welds. Restricting heat input to under 16 kJ/mm (400 kJ/in.) and interpass temperature to under 150 °C (300 °F...
Book Chapter

Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 July 1997
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.wip.t65930365
EISBN: 978-1-62708-359-1
... flux is available. Fillers are employed to produce weld metal of similar composition to the base metal. Heat input kept low. Rapidly cool to maintain weld ductility. Precipitation-hardenable alloys containing Al, Ti, Ni are very difficult to weld. Can obtain high joint efficiency up to 2.5 mm...