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Published: 01 September 2008
Fig. 76 Maximum temperature drop as a function of depth in the hardened steel during grinding with various work speeds, V w . Source: Ref 15 , 65 , 66 More
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Published: 01 September 2008
Fig. 77 Grinding temperature cycles in different depths in the hardened steel at given grinding conditions. Source: Ref 15 , 65 More
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Published: 01 September 2008
Fig. 56 Prior-austenite grains formed in hardened steel 40, which were due to abnormal growth during the austenitizing process, Etched: S. Bechet and L. Beaujurda. Original magnification: 500× More
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Published: 01 August 2005
Fig. 7 Cleavage fracture in hardened steel, viewed under the scanning electron microscope. Note progression of “river” marks in the direction of arrow. Grain boundaries were crossed without apparent effect. Original magnification at 2000× More
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Published: 01 August 2005
Fig. 8 Intergranular fracture in hardened steel, viewed under the scanning electron microscope. Note that fracture takes place between the grains; thus the fracture surface has a “rock-candy” appearance that reveals the shapes of part of the individual grains. Original magnification at 2000× More
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Published: 30 November 2013
Fig. 7 Torsional fracture of a 1½-inch-diameter case-hardened steel shaft, illustrating cracking of the hard, brittle case and transverse shear fracture at the right end across the relatively soft, ductile core. Hot etched to reveal twisting and distortion of the originally straight grain flow More
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Published: 30 November 2013
Fig. 13 Cleavage fracture in hardened steel showing numerous “river” marks. The overall direction of crack propagation is in the direction of the arrow (i.e., downstream). New river patterns are created where grain boundaries were crossed. 125×. More
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Published: 01 August 2013
Fig. 4.28 Deformation characteristics in bake-hardened steel. Source: Ref 4.1 More
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Published: 01 November 2012
Fig. 42 Intergranular fracture in hardened steel, viewed under the scanning electron microscope. Note that fracture takes place between the grains; thus, the fracture surface has a “rock candy” appearance that reveals the shapes of part of the individual grains. Original magnification: 2000 More
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Published: 01 December 2000
Fig. 5.51 Allowable contact stress number for carburized and hardened steel More
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Published: 01 December 1984
Figure 5-16 Vickers microhardness as a function of test load for five hardened steel test blocks. More
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Published: 01 August 2012
Fig. 7.6 Setup for strip reduction. A, strip; B, hardened steel rod; C, pressing block; D, distance sheet; E, vertical piston; F, horizontal piston with claw; G, tools. Source: Ref 7.12 More
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Published: 01 December 1999
Fig. 7.8 Hardness of carburized and hardened steel 30KhCT as a function of tempering temperature and time. Source: Ref 17 More
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Published: 30 April 2021
Fig. 8.13 Wear of a hardened steel mason’s trowel after 50 years of use (abrasion by mortar and rubbing on bricks). The original shape of the trowel on the bottom was similar to that of the top trowel. More
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Published: 01 September 2005
Fig. 52 Allowable contact stress number for carburized and hardened steel More
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Published: 01 January 2015
Fig. 19.16 Map of fracture modes in hardened steels produced by tensile and bending loads as a function of tempering temperature and steel carbon content. The transition from ductile to brittle intergranular fracture in low-temperature-tempered (LTT) steels at 0.5% C is shown and approaches More
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Published: 01 December 2006
Fig. 3.68 Extruded bars with helical gear teeth in case-hardening steel (Source: ASEA) More
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Published: 01 December 1999
Fig. 6.16 Core properties and fatigue strength of case-hardened steels. (a) Effect of core hardness and case depth on the fatigue strength of a 1.4%Cr-3.5%Ni steel in which core carbon was varied from 0.09 to 0.42%. Arrow indicates maximum fatigue strength for Cr-Ni steels with 0.13 mm case More
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Published: 01 September 2005
Fig. 26 Bend ductility transition curves for carburized and hardened steels. Nominal alloy contents of the steels are listed within the diagram. Source: Ref 59 More
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Published: 01 March 2006
Fig. 2.5 Response of annealed and hardened steels under cyclic straining. (a) Annealed 304 stainless steel (cyclically hardening). (b) Hardened 4340 steel (cyclically softening). Source: Ref 2.2 More