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hardenability curves

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Book Chapter

Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 August 2015
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.piht2.t55050347
EISBN: 978-1-62708-311-9
... Abstract This appendix provides hardenability curves for several H-steels (1045H, 4130H, 4140H, 4142H, 4145H, 4340H, 5160H, 8620H) and one alloy steel (E52100). hardenability curves hardness heat-treating temperature steel Fig. A6.1 Heat-treating temperatures recommended by SAE...
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Published: 01 March 2006
Fig. 21 Hardenability curves for several alloy steels. Source: Ref 9 More
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Published: 01 March 2006
Fig. 23 Comparison of Jominy hardenability curves for 8620H and 8620 steels. Chemistry at maximum and minimum of the chemistry range. Source: Ref 11 More
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Published: 01 November 2013
Fig. 14 Typical Jominy hardenability curves for medium-carbon steels, austenitized at 845 °C (1550 °F) from initial normalized condition. Source: Ref 1 More
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Published: 01 December 2000
Fig. 5.4(b) Hardenability curves for different steels with the same carbon content. A, shallow hardening; B, intermediate hardening; C, deep hardening More
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Published: 01 December 1999
Fig. 5.31 Hardenability curves and corresponding microstructures for a 25CrMo4 steel. Source: Ref 52 More
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Published: 01 September 2005
Fig. 6 Hardenability curves for different steels with the same carbon content. A, shallow hardening; B, intermediate hardening; C, deep hardening More
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Published: 31 December 2020
Fig. 6 Jominy hardenability curves of two steels with different hardenabilities and cross-sectional hardness curve for a 100 mm (4 in.) diameter quenched round bar of the same steel More
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Published: 01 January 1998
Fig. 10-5 Jominy end-quench hardenability curves for O1 tool steel containing 0.95% C, 0.30% Si, 1.20% Mn, 0.50% W, 0.50% Cr, and 0.20% V, hardened from three different austenitizing temperatures. Data from Teledyne VASCO More
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Published: 01 January 1998
Fig. 10-6 Jominy end-quench hardenability curves for O7 tool steel containing 1.20% C, 0.30% Mn, 0.26% Si, 0.70% Cr, 0.25% Mo, 1.56% W, and 0.20% V. Data from Teledyne VASCO More
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Published: 01 January 1998
Fig. 13-6 Jominy end-quench hardenability curves for chromium hot-work tool steels. Courtesy of Teledyne VASCO Curve Type Composition, % Austenitizing temperature C Si Cr W Mo °C °F 1 H12 0.35 0.92 4.76 1.42 1.45 1010 1850 2 ... 0.96 0.29 3.93 More
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Published: 01 January 1998
Fig. 15-9 Jominy end-quench hardenability curves for type P20 mold steel after quenching and tempering at indicated temperatures for 2 h. Courtesy of Teledyne VASCO More
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Published: 01 December 1995
Fig. 24-26 Hardenability curves for C, Mn-B, Ni-Cr-Mo, and Cr-Mo cast steels More
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Published: 01 December 1995
Fig. 24-27 Hardenability curves for carbon cast steels More
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Published: 01 December 1995
Fig. 24-28 Hardenability curves for carbon cast steels More
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Published: 01 June 2008
Fig. 11.14 Typical Jominy hardenability curves for medium-carbon steels austenitized at 845 °C (1550 °F) from initial normalized condition More
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Published: 01 October 2011
Fig. 3.30 Artifcial age-hardening curves for binary aluminum-copper alloys quenched in water at 100 °C (212 °F) and aged at 150 °C (302 °F) More
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Published: 01 March 2006
Fig. 20 End-quench hardenability curve for 1541 carbon steel. Source: Ref 9 More
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Published: 01 March 2006
Fig. 6 Precipitation-hardening curves of beryllium-copper binary alloys. As the percentage of beryllium increases, the aging time required to reach maximum hardness is shortened, and the maximum hardness is increased. These alloys were quenched form 800 °C (1470 °F) and aged at 350 °C (660 °F More
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Published: 01 May 2018
FIG. 4.8 The first age-hardening curve determined by Alfred Wilm in 1899. Source: Ref 3 . More