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Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 November 2010
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.omfrc.t53030043
EISBN: 978-1-62708-349-2
...Abstract Abstract Rough grinding and polishing of mounted specimens are required to prepare the composite sample for optical analysis. This chapter describes these techniques for preparing composite materials. First, it provides information on grinding and polishing equipment and describes...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 September 2005
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.gmpm.t51250089
EISBN: 978-1-62708-345-4
... a comparison of steels for gear cutting. The operating principles of computer numerical control and hobbing machines are also covered. This is followed by sections that discuss the processes involved in grinding, honing, and lapping of gears. Finally, the chapter provides information on the superfinishing...
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Published: 01 November 2013
Fig. 34 Production grinding applications of grinding wheels. Either conventional abrasives or superabrasives may be employed. (a) Horizontal-spindle surface grinding. (b) Vertical-spindle surface grinding. (c) Creep feed grinding. (d) Outside diameter cylindrical grinding. (e) Internal grinding More
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Published: 01 March 2002
Fig. 7.10 Macro- and micrographs of a cast high-carbon, high-chromium grinding ball cut with an abrasive wheel. (a), (c), and (e) With water coolant. (b), (d), and (f) Without coolant. The specimen cut without the water coolant developed cracks along the chromium carbide networks and had regions More
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Published: 01 August 2018
Fig. 5.3 Schematic presentation of subsurface work hardening caused by grinding. More
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Published: 01 August 2018
Fig. 5.6 Poorly polished sample. Many scratches from grinding or from previous polishing steps are visible. More
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Published: 01 September 2008
Fig. 75 Basic forms of wear and damage on the grinding wheel grain. Source: Ref 15 , 64 More
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Published: 01 September 2008
Fig. 77 Grinding temperature cycles in different depths in the hardened steel at given grinding conditions. Source: Ref 15 , 65 More
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Published: 01 September 2008
Fig. 80 Subsurface profile of relative grinding stress on bearing location “A”. Source: Ref 15 More
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Published: 01 September 2008
Fig. 81 Relative grinding stress region through thin surface layer after gentle grinding conditions. Source: Ref 54 More
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Published: 01 September 2008
Fig. 82 Relative grinding stress region through thin surface layer after abusive or normal grinding conditions. Source: Ref 54 More
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Published: 01 September 2008
Fig. 37 Example of grinding cracks on the flank of a worm gear. Source: Ref 85 More
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Published: 01 September 2008
Fig. 26 Grinding cracks on AISI 5160 steel cam shaft after induction hardening and low tempering (high-hardness tempering). Original magnification: 200× More
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Published: 01 September 2008
Fig. 12 Examples of grinding cracks. (a) Two views of an S1 tool cutter die cracked and spalled after grinding. As-received (left) and after magnetic particle testing (right), accentuating the cracks Source: Ref 9 . (b) A D2 die that cracked due to incorrect grinding (arrow indicates grinding More
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Published: 01 September 2008
Fig. 13 (a) White layer on a tool surface rehardened by an incorrect grinding procedure. (b) Typical hardness profile in regions close to cracks. Source: Ref 11 More
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Published: 01 March 2002
Fig. 7.36 Depth of scratches from grinding and depth of the deformation area beneath the scratches. Source: Ref 2 More
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Published: 01 September 2008
Fig. 2 Large gear that cracked during grinding operations. Localized thermal gradients during grinding resulted in high residual stresses and eventual cracking. Temper etching (dilute nitric acid in water) revealed the presence of abusive grinding. More
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Published: 01 November 2012
Fig. 48 Surface characteristics produced by low-stress and abusive grinding of AISI 4340 steel. (a) Low-stress grinding produced no visible surface alterations. (b) The untempered martensitic white layer shown from abusive conditions has a hardness of 65 HRC and is approximately 0.025 to 0.050 mm More
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Published: 01 November 2012
Fig. 50 Loss of fatigue strength from the abusive grinding of 4340 steel quenched and tempered to 50 HRC. UTM, untempered martensite. Source: Ref 27 More
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Published: 01 November 2012
Fig. 51 Effect of electrical discharge machining (EDM) and grinding on the fatigue strength of Inconel 718. Fatigue tests involved cantilever bending at room temperature and zero mean stress. Source: Ref 26 More