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Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2022
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.isceg.t59320103
EISBN: 978-1-62708-332-4
... Abstract This chapter covers mechanical properties, microstructures, chemical compositions, manufacturing processes, and engineering of gating practices for several applications of gray, white, and alloyed cast irons. It begins with a description of material standards, followed by a section...
Book Chapter

Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2001
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.aub.t61170021
EISBN: 978-1-62708-297-6
... Abstract This article covers the metallurgy and properties of gray irons. It describes the classes or grades of gray iron, the types of applications for which they are suited, and the corresponding compositional ranges. It discusses the role of major, minor, and trace elements, how...
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Published: 01 March 2002
Fig. 2.50 Mottled pearlitic cast iron. Gray iron at upper left and white iron at lower right of photo. 4% picral etch. 250× More
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Published: 01 January 2022
Fig. 4.12 Comparison of properties of gray iron, malleable iron, ductile iron, and steel. Source: Ref 9 More
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Published: 01 August 2018
Fig. 17.64 Mottled gray iron. Dark areas are regions of gray cast irons (the contours are not as clear as in Fig. 17.63 ). The rest of the cross section is white cast iron. Etchant: picral. More
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Published: 01 March 2006
Fig. 2 Typical microstructures of four types of cast iron. (a) Gray iron showing graphite flakes (black) in a pearlite matrix. 380×. (b) White cast iron showing massive carbides (white) and pearlite. 380×. Malleable iron showing graphite nodules in a ferrite matrix. 380×. (d) Ductile iron More
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Published: 01 March 2001
Fig. 2 Cross sections of laser-melted cast iron surfaces. (a) Gray iron. (b) Ductile iron. Source: Ref 3 More
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Published: 01 June 2008
Fig. 24.9 Flake graphite in gray iron specimen deep etched to reveal flakes. Original magnification: 500×. Source: Ref 9 More
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Published: 01 June 2008
Fig. 24.11 Effect of graphite flake length on tensile strength of gray iron. Source: Ref 2 More
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Published: 01 March 2002
Fig. 5.14 Micrographs of pearlitic gray iron taken (a) with and (b) without a green filter. Note the improved resolution in the micrograph taken with the green filter (see arrows). The light gray speckled constituent is steadite (iron phosphide eutectic), the lamellar constituent is pearlite More
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Published: 01 June 2008
Fig. 24.4 Effect of carbon equivalence on tensile strength of gray iron. Source: Ref 2 More
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Published: 01 December 2015
Fig. 4 A 200 mm (8 in.) diameter gray iron pipe that failed because of graphitic corrosion. The pipe was part of a subterranean fire control system. The external surface of the pipe was covered with soil; the internal surface was covered with water. Severe graphitic corrosion occurred along More
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Published: 01 March 2002
Fig. 1.25 Types of graphite flakes in gray iron (American Foundryman’s Society-ASTM). In the recommended practice (ASTM A 247), these charts are shown at a magnification of 100×. They have been reduced to one-third size for reproduction here. More
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Published: 01 October 2011
Fig. 10.5 As-cast gray iron (Fe-2.8C-1.85Si-1.05Mn-0.04P-0.025S) with pearlitic matrix and flake graphite (dark). (a) Original magnification: 100×. (b) Original magnification: 500×, showing fine pearlite. Source: Ref 10.5 More
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Published: 01 October 2011
Fig. 10.6 As-cast gray iron with a pearlitic-ferritic matrix. P, pearlite; F, ferrite. (a) Original magnification: 100×. (b) Original magnification: 500×. A ternary phosphorous eutectic (E) known as steadite is a common constituent of gray iron microstructures. Source: Ref 10.5 More
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Published: 01 October 2011
Fig. 10.12 Proeutectic graphite. (a) Kish graphite in as-cast gray iron (Fe-4.3C-1.5Si-0.5Mn-0.12P-0.08S). (b) Formation of lumpy or starlike proeutectic graphite with rapid cooling of a hypereutectic alloy. As-polished. Original magnification: 100× More
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Published: 01 October 2011
Fig. 10.13 Type A flake graphite in (a) hypoeutectic as-cast gray iron (Fe-2.8C-1.85Si-0.5Mn-0.04P-0.025S) and (b) hypereutectic as-cast gray iron (Fe-3.5C-2.95Si-0.4Mn-0.08P-0.02S-0.13Ni-0.15Cu). As-polished. Original magnification: 100× More
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Published: 01 November 2007
Fig. 16.9 Gray iron with a ferrite-pearlite matrix. Original magnification: 250× More
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Published: 01 March 2006
Fig. 3 Relations between observed and converted hardness values for gray iron. Source: Ref 4 More
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Published: 01 March 2006
Fig. 5 Room-temperature hardness of gray iron normalizing. Effect of temperature at start of air cooling on hardness of normalized gray iron rings 120 mm (4¾ in.) in outside diam 95 mm (3¾ in.) in inside diam and 38 mm (1¾ in.) in length. Source: Ref 5 , 6 More