1-20 of 395 Search Results for

gray cast iron

Follow your search
Access your saved searches in your account

Would you like to receive an alert when new items match your search?
Close Modal
Sort by
Image
Published: 01 August 2018
Fig. 17.5 Cooling curves (schematic) of (a) gray cast iron, (b) white cast iron, and (c) mottled cast iron. In addition to the stable and metastable eutectic temperatures, the temperatures at the start of the solidification of the pro-eutetic austenite (T ℓ ) and the end of solidification (T f More
Image
Published: 01 August 2018
Fig. 17.65 Mottled cast iron. Dark areas are gray cast iron. The rest of the cross section is white cast iron. Etchant: picral. More
Image
Published: 01 August 2018
Fig. 17.64 Mottled gray iron. Dark areas are regions of gray cast irons (the contours are not as clear as in Fig. 17.63 ). The rest of the cross section is white cast iron. Etchant: picral. More
Image
Published: 01 August 2018
Fig. 17.40 Gray cast iron C = 3.18%, Si = 2.5%, P = 0.62%. As cast. Graphite flakes and fine microstructure composed of pearlite and interdendritic areas with steadite. Etchant: picral More
Image
Published: 01 August 2018
Fig. 17.56 Gray cast iron, as cast. C = 3.25%, Si = 1.82%, P = 0.48%. Pearlite, ferrite, lamellar graphite, and steadite. Hardness: 108 HB. Etchant: picral. More
Image
Published: 30 November 2023
Fig. 4.5 Gray cast iron pallet More
Image
Published: 01 June 2008
Fig. 24.8 Class 30 gray cast iron. Source: Ref 8 More
Image
Published: 01 June 2008
Fig. 24.13 Effect of cooling rate on gray cast iron. Source: Ref 11 More
Image
Published: 01 June 2008
Fig. 24.15 Typical tension stress-strain curves for gray cast iron. Source: Ref 8 More
Image
Published: 01 March 2002
Fig. 3.63 Microstructure of a gray cast iron water pipe with corrosion penetrating below the surface along graphite flake networks (cells) (see arrows). (a) unetched, 50× and (b) 4% picral etch, 500× More
Image
Published: 01 March 2002
Fig. 5.13 Micrographs of pearlitic gray cast iron taken with 40× objectives of different numerical apertures. Micrograph (a) taken with an objective with NA = 0.55 and micrograph (b) taken with NA = 0.65. Note the better resolution in (b) (see arrows). The white constituent is ferrite More
Image
Published: 01 January 2000
Fig. 51 Examples of graphitic corrosion of gray cast-iron parts. (a) Cross sections cut through graphitically corroded regions will readily show bright, intact metal surrounded by a soft, dark, corroded area. (b) Graphitically corroded valve butterfly. Original surface contours are preserved More
Image
Published: 01 March 2002
Fig. 1.24 Micrograph of a gray cast iron showing a microstructure consisting of pearlite (gray etching constituent), ferrite (light etching constituent), and graphite flakes (dark constituent). Etched in 4% picral. 100× More
Image
Published: 01 March 2002
Fig. 2.48 Pearlitic gray cast iron (3.22% C, 0.77% Mn, and 1.98% Si). Elongated, dark particles are graphite flakes. 4% picral etch. 500× More
Image
Published: 01 March 2002
Fig. 2.56 The eutectic constituent steadite (see arrow) in a pearlitic gray cast iron. 4% picral etch. 500× More
Image
Published: 01 November 2007
Fig. 16.6 SEM micrographs of deep-etched gray cast iron (3.5% C, 2% Si). (a) Type A (flake). Original magnification: 75×. (b) Type D. Original magnification: 1000×. Source: Ref 16.4 More
Image
Published: 01 November 2007
Fig. 16.7 Fracture surfaces of gray cast iron (3.5% C, 2% Si) revealed in SEM micrographs. (a) Type A (flake). Original magnification: 220×. (b) Type A (flake) at a dendrite. Original magnification: 600×. (c) Type D. Original magnification: 1000×. Source: Ref 16.4 More
Image
Published: 01 August 2013
Fig. 7.11 Microstructure of gray cast iron. The black flakes are graphite, the white areas are ferrite, and the grey areas are pearlite. Source: Ref 7.6 More
Image
Published: 30 November 2013
Fig. 5 Typical stress-strain curves for three classes of gray cast iron. This nonlinear behavior is caused by the graphite flakes, which act as internal stress concentrations, or notches, within the metal matrix. Source: Ref 3 More
Image
Published: 30 November 2013
Fig. 4 Erosive wear of a gray cast iron water pump impeller. The sharp corners of the (a) new impeller have been (b) completely rounded off by the abrasive wear of sand in the cooling system. The change in shape of the vanes reduces the efficiency of the pump; if abrasive wear were to continue More