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glass transition temperature

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Published: 01 December 2003
Fig. 16 Relationships among glass transition temperature ( T g ), melt temperature ( T m ), molecular weight, and polymer properties. Source: Ref 13 More
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Published: 01 December 2003
Fig. 17 Variation of glass transition temperature ( T g ) with cure time and temperature. Source: Ref 23 More
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Published: 01 November 2010
Fig. 15.2 Effect of moisture on glass transition temperature More
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2003
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.cfap.t69780115
EISBN: 978-1-62708-281-5
... analysis, thermomechanical analysis, and rheological analysis. The basic thermal properties covered include thermal conductivity, temperature resistance, thermal expansion, specific heat, and the determination of glass-transition temperatures. The article further describes various factors influencing...
Book Chapter

Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 August 2013
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.ems.t53730099
EISBN: 978-1-62708-283-9
... glass at a glass transition temperature. The relative positions of molecules are frozen so the amorphous glass is not a liquid. The change of specific volume on cooling is schematically illustrated in Fig. 9.11 . Fig. 9.11 Change of the specific volume of polyethylene with temperature...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2003
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.cfap.t69780314
EISBN: 978-1-62708-281-5
... Abstract This article describes the mechanisms of moisture-induced damage in polymeric materials, covering the characteristics of important structural plastics; the effects of moisture on glass transition temperature, modulus, creep, and stress relaxation of plastic materials; and moisture...
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Published: 01 November 2012
, higher temperature (approaching glass transition), necking and cold drawing; 4, above glass transition temperature, homogeneous deformation (quasi-rubberlike behavior). (b) Variation of the stress-strain behavior of polymethyl methacrylate with test temperature. Source: Ref 21 More
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Published: 01 August 2013
Fig. 8.4 Temperature dependence of viscosity for several glasses. The “working range” is the temperature range in which glasses can be economically shaped. The straight lines on the semi-log plot do not extend below the glass transition temperature. More
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Published: 01 August 2005
, higher temperature (approaching glass transition), necking and cold drawing; 4, above glass transition temperature, homogeneous deformation (quasi-rubber-like behavior). Source: Ref 7.10 . (b) Variation of the stress-strain behavior of PMMA with test temperature. Source: Ref 7.19 More
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Published: 01 December 2003
Fig. 1 Log relaxation modulus, E ( t ), as a function of log time, t (or temperature), for a glassy thermoplastic material. 1, glassy plateau; 2, transition region; 3, rubbery plateau; 4, flow region. T g , glass transition temperature More
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Published: 01 October 2012
Fig. 12.9 Schematic diagrams showing the effects of temperature on the modulus of (a) amorphous and (b) semicrystalline thermoplastics. T g , glass transition temperature; T m , melting temperature More
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Published: 01 August 2013
Fig. 9.11 Change of the specific volume of polyethylene with temperature. If it does not crystallize at the melting temperature, polyethylene will remain a supercooled liquid until it reaches its glass transition temperature. Source: Ref 9.1 More
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Published: 01 December 2003
Fig. 18 Differential scanning calorimetry of nylon gears. MW, molecular weight; T g , glass transition temperature; T m , melt temperature More
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Published: 01 October 2012
Fig. 8.53 Amorphous or dual-resin bonding. PEEK, polyetheretherketone; PEI, polyetherimide; T g , glass transition temperature; T m , melt temperature. Source: Ref 8.1 More
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Published: 01 December 2003
Fig. 1 Residual stress distributions for various values of the Biot number, m , for the case that the initial temperature, T 0 , lies far above the glass transition temperature, T g . T ∝ , final temperature below T g ; L , sample thickness. Source: Ref 4 More
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Published: 30 April 2020
Fig. 3.4 Contrasting cooling curves for amorphous and crystalline polymers. A crystalline polymer has a volume change at the melting temperature, T M , during slow cooling, but an amorphous polymer reaches a brittle condition below the glass transition temperature, T g . More
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Published: 01 December 2003
Fig. 5 A 1000 h creep modulus of several polymers as a function of temperature. PBT, polybutylene terephthalate; PC, polycarbonate; PPO, polyphenylene oxide; PVC, polyvinyl chloride; PP, polypropylene; HDPE, high-density polyethylene; T g , glass transition temperature More
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Published: 01 December 2003
Fig. 13 Mer chemical structure of representative hydrocarbon thermo-plastic polymers (see Table 6 for glass-transition temperatures) More
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Published: 01 December 2003
Fig. 1 Change in behavior of a polymeric material with increasing strain rate and/or decreasing temperature. (a) Brittle behavior. (b) Limited ductility behavior. (c) Cold drawing behavior. (d) Rubbery behavior. Curve (a) could represent testing below the glass transition temperature. Source More
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Published: 01 December 2003
Fig. 3 Critical strain for the crazing or cracking of swollen polysulfone as a function of the glass transition temperature, T g , of solvent-equilibrated films. Source: Ref 31 More