1-20 of 283 Search Results for

fusion welding

Follow your search
Access your saved searches in your account

Would you like to receive an alert when new items match your search?
Close Modal
Sort by
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 November 2011
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.jub.t53290079
EISBN: 978-1-62708-306-5
... Abstract This chapter discusses the fusion welding processes, namely oxyfuel gas welding, oxyacetylene braze welding, stud welding (stud arc welding and capacitor discharge stud welding), high-frequency welding, electron beam welding, laser beam welding, hybrid laser arc welding, and thermit...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 November 2011
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.jub.t53290099
EISBN: 978-1-62708-306-5
... Abstract During fusion welding, the thermal cycles produced by the moving heat source causes physical state changes, metallurgical phase transformations, and transient thermal stresses and metal movement. This chapter begins by discussing weld metal solidification behavior and the solid-state...
Image
Published: 01 November 2011
Fig. 5.2 Spectrum of practical heat intensities used for fusion welding. Source: Ref 5.1 More
Image
Published: 01 December 2006
Fig. 3 Solidification morphologies of fusion welded alloy 2205. (a) As-welded base metal. (b) As-welded composite region. (c) As-welded weld metal. (d) Postweld heat treated solution-annealed base metal. (e) Solution annealed composite region. (f) Solution annealed weld metal. Source: Ref 2 More
Image
Published: 01 August 1999
Fig. 11.1 A representative example of a section of a fusion weld illustrating the terminology used to identify features of the weld. The locations of a number of isotherms in the heat-affected zone in the parent metal are also indicated. More
Image
Published: 01 November 2011
Fig. 5.10 Typical hardness traverses across a single-pass fusion weld made in metals or alloys strengthened by (a) solid-solution alloying, (b) precipitation hardening, (c) transformation hardening, (d) work hardening, and (e) dispersion strengthening. Source: Ref 5.6 , p 482 More
Image
Published: 01 November 2011
Fig. 6.20 Friction stir fusion weld. A, parent metal; B, heat-affected zone (HAZ); C, unrecrystallized area; D, recrystallized nugget; C + D, thermomechanically affected zone (TMAZ). Courtesy of The Welding Institute More
Image
Published: 01 October 2012
Fig. 2.36 Strength across fusion weld joint. Ultimate tensile strength values are estimated from hardness readings. Source: Ref 2.26 More
Image
Published: 01 October 2012
Fig. 2.44 Friction stir fusion weld. A = parent metal (PM); B = heat-affected zone (HAZ); C = unrecrystallized area; D = recrystallized nugget; C + D = thermomechanically affected zone (TMAZ). Courtesy of The Welding Institute More
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 March 2002
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.stg2.t61280149
EISBN: 978-1-62708-267-9
... decisions. It discusses the basic concepts of fusion welding and the differences between solid-solution-hardened and precipitation-hardened wrought superalloys. It addresses joint integrity, design, weld-related cracking, and the effect of grain size, precipitates, and contaminants. It covers common fusion...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 July 1997
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.wip.t65930311
EISBN: 978-1-62708-359-1
... Abstract This article discusses the fusion welding processes that are most widely used for joining titanium, namely, gas-tungsten arc welding, gas-metal arc welding, plasma arc welding, laser-beam welding, and electron-beam welding. It describes several important and interrelated aspects...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 November 2011
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.jub.t53290001
EISBN: 978-1-62708-306-5
... examining the various joining processes, namely fusion welding, solid-state welding, brazing, soldering, mechanical fastening, and adhesive bonding. In addition, it provides information on several design considerations related to the joining process and selection of the appropriate process for joining...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 July 1997
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.wip.t65930071
EISBN: 978-1-62708-359-1
... Abstract The formation of defects in materials that have been fusion welded is a major concern in the design of welded assemblies. This article describes four types of defects that, in particular, have been the focus of much attention because of the magnitude of their impact on product quality...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 July 1997
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.wip.t65930353
EISBN: 978-1-62708-359-1
... Abstract This article discusses the weldability and fusion weld properties of refractory metal alloys. The alloys discussed include tantalum, niobium, rhenium, molybdenum, and tungsten. molybdenum niobium rhenium tantalum tungsten weldability THE REFRACTORY METALS, which include...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 July 2009
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.bcp.t52230401
EISBN: 978-1-62708-298-3
... Abstract Beryllium has been successfully joined by fusion welding, brazing, solid-state bonding, and soldering. This chapter describes these processes in detail along with their advantages and disadvantages. It also addresses application considerations such as surface preparation, joint design...
Image
Published: 01 August 1999
Fig. 8.17 (Part 2) (e) to (h) 0.2% C, Ni-Cr-Mo alloy (0.18C-0.21Si-3.2Ni-1.9Cr-0.4Mo, wt%). (e) Section of heat-affected zone adjacent to a fusion weld. 3% nital. 75×. (f) Section of heat-affected zone adjacent to a fusion weld. 3% nital. 500×. (g) Scanning electron micrograph More
Image
Published: 01 August 1999
-0.20Si-0.30Mo, wt%). Heated for 30 min at 1275 °C, water quenched, tempered for 30 min at 200 °C. 765 HV. Picral. 1000×. (e) to (h) 0.2% C, Ni-Cr-Mo alloy (0.18C-0.21Si-3.2Ni-1.9Cr-0.4Mo, wt%). (e) Section of heat-affected zone adjacent to a fusion weld. 3% nital. 75×. (f) Section of heat More
Image
Published: 01 December 1989
Fig. 5.19. Use of statistics of past failures to predict future failure rates ( Ref 31 ). Based on experience reported by the Central Electricity Generating Board (U.K.) with dissimilar-metal fusion welds in 2¼Cr-1Mo steel tubes ( Ref 32 ). Data are for 9474 welds made with austenitic filler More
Image
Published: 01 August 2018
Fig. 10.78 Schematic cross section of two bimetallic saw blades. (a) The tool steel (high-speed steel) is fusion welded to a cheaper, higher toughness steel that will make up the body of the saw band. (b) The high-speed steel is forge welded (using pressure and temperature) to the tough steel More
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2006
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.cw.t51820169
EISBN: 978-1-62708-339-3
... be considered. When dissimilar metals are joined by arc (fusion) welding processes, alloying between the base metals and a filler metal; when used, becomes a major consideration. The resulting weld metal can behave much differently from one or both base metals during subsequent processing or in service...