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friction welding

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Published: 01 November 2011
Fig. 6.16 Fundamental steps in the friction welding process: (a) one workpiece is rotated, and the other workpiece is held stationary; (b) both workpieces are brought together, and an axial force is applied to begin the upsetting process; (c) workpiece rotation is stopped, and the upsetting More
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Published: 01 August 2005
Fig. 1.6 Schematic showing fundamental steps in the frictional welding process (involving rotational movement). (a) One part or workpiece is rotated and the other part is held stationary. (b) Both parts are brought together, and axial stress is applied to begin frictional welding. (c) Rotation More
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Published: 01 October 2012
Fig. 2.43 Friction stir welding. Courtesy of ESAB Welding Equipment AB More
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Published: 01 November 2011
Fig. 6.19 Friction stir welding of aluminum alloy. Courtesy of ESAB Welding Equipment AB More
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Published: 01 October 2012
Fig. 2.41 Friction stir welding process. Source: Ref 2.32 More
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Published: 01 October 2012
Fig. 2.42 Sample friction stir welding tool geometries. (a) Oval shape. (b) Paddle shape. (c) Re-entrant. (d) Changing spiral form. Courtesy of The Welding Institute More
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Published: 01 October 2011
Fig. 6.35 Friction stir welding process. (a) Process schematic. (b) Weld zone showing regions of heat-affected zone (HAZ) and thermomechanical-affected zone (TMAZ). Source: Ref 6.11 More
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Published: 01 November 2011
Fig. 6.17 Friction stir welding process. Source: Ref 6.10 More
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Published: 01 November 2011
Fig. 6.18 Example of friction stir welding pin tool. Source: Ref 6.10 , p 17 More
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Published: 01 December 2006
Fig. 5 Schematic illustration of the friction stir welding process More
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Published: 01 January 2015
Fig. 12.12 Schematic of the friction stir welding process. Source: Ref 12.18 More
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Published: 01 January 2015
Fig. 12.18 Cross section of an early friction stir welding trial in 6.35 mm (0.25 in.) thick Ti-6Al-4V shows three different weld zones: parent metal (A), deformed surface region (B), and partially transformed weld-root zone containing voids (C). Source: Ref 12.18 More
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Published: 01 June 2008
Fig. 26.13 Friction stir welding process. Source: Ref 14 More
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 November 2011
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.jub.t53290137
EISBN: 978-1-62708-306-5
... welding, forge welding, roll welding, coextrusion welding, cold welding, friction welding, friction stir welding, explosion welding, and ultrasonic welding. coextrusion welding cold welding diffusion welding explosion welding forge welding friction welding roll welding ultrasonic welding...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 July 1997
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.wip.t65930197
EISBN: 978-1-62708-359-1
... of service failures. The discussion covers various factors that may lead to the failure of arc welds, electroslag welds, electrogas welds, resistance welds, flash welds, upset butt welds, friction welds, electron beam welds, and laser beam welds. corrosion deformation fracture inspection mechanical...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2006
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.cw.t51820169
EISBN: 978-1-62708-339-3
... welding, explosion welding, friction welding, or ultrasonic welding), brazing, or soldering where alloying between the metals is normally insignificant. This chapter describes the factors influencing joint integrity and discusses the corrosion behavior of dissimilar metal weldments. brazing...
Book Chapter

Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 August 1999
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.lmcs.t66560309
EISBN: 978-1-62708-291-4
..., including electroslag, TIG, gas, electron-beam, and arc welding as well as vacuum diffusion, forge, friction, electrical-resistance, and explosive welding. It also discusses the effect of welding temperature, pressure, and composition on the transformations that occur in and around the weld, and it includes...
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Published: 01 August 1999
Fig. 11.5 (Part 1) Friction butt weld of mild steel to mild steel (0.15% C, 0.15C-0.20Si-0.56Mn, wt%) bar. (a) Weld region. 5% nital. 2×. (b) Weld region. Arrow indicates approximate position of the weld interface. 3% nital. 100×. (c) Fully austenitized zone immediately adjacent to weld More
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Published: 01 August 1999
Fig. 11.5 (Part 2) Friction butt weld of mild steel to mild steel (0.15% C, 0.15C0.20Si-0.56Mn, wt%) bar. (a) Weld region. 5% nital. 2×. (b) Weld region. Arrow indicates approximate position of the weld interface. 3% nital. 100×. (c) Fully austenitized zone immediately adjacent to weld More
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Published: 01 August 1999
Fig. 11.6 (Part 1) Friction butt weld of mild steel to mild steel (0.15% C) bar. The structure of unaffected parent metal was similar to that shown in Fig. 11.5 (Part 2) (f) . Its hardness was 190 HV. (a) Weld region. 2% nital. 2×. (b) Weld region. Picral. 100×. (c) Central region More