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friction stir welding

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Published: 01 November 2011
Fig. 6.19 Friction stir welding of aluminum alloy. Courtesy of ESAB Welding Equipment AB More
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Published: 01 October 2012
Fig. 2.43 Friction stir welding. Courtesy of ESAB Welding Equipment AB More
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Published: 30 June 2023
Fig. 10.20 Friction stir welding (a) process and (b) example More
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Published: 01 June 2008
Fig. 26.13 Friction stir welding process. Source: Ref 14 More
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Published: 01 October 2011
Fig. 6.35 Friction stir welding process. (a) Process schematic. (b) Weld zone showing regions of heat-affected zone (HAZ) and thermomechanical-affected zone (TMAZ). Source: Ref 6.11 More
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Published: 01 January 2015
Fig. 12.12 Schematic of the friction stir welding process. Source: Ref 12.18 More
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Published: 01 January 2015
Fig. 12.18 Cross section of an early friction stir welding trial in 6.35 mm (0.25 in.) thick Ti-6Al-4V shows three different weld zones: parent metal (A), deformed surface region (B), and partially transformed weld-root zone containing voids (C). Source: Ref 12.18 More
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Published: 01 November 2011
Fig. 6.17 Friction stir welding process. Source: Ref 6.10 More
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Published: 01 November 2011
Fig. 6.18 Example of friction stir welding pin tool. Source: Ref 6.10 , p 17 More
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Published: 01 December 2006
Fig. 5 Schematic illustration of the friction stir welding process More
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Published: 01 October 2012
Fig. 2.41 Friction stir welding process. Source: Ref 2.32 More
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Published: 01 October 2012
Fig. 2.42 Sample friction stir welding tool geometries. (a) Oval shape. (b) Paddle shape. (c) Re-entrant. (d) Changing spiral form. Courtesy of The Welding Institute More
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Published: 30 June 2023
Fig. 14.7 Wide friction stir welded (FSW) panels used for shipbuilding. Courtesy of Hydro Aluminium More
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Published: 01 January 2015
Fig. 12.13 Cross section of a friction stir weld in commercially pure (grade 2) titanium produced at The Welding Institute in 1995. Source: Ref 12.18 More
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Published: 01 January 2015
Fig. 12.14 Surface appearance of a good-quality friction stir weld in 6.35 mm (0.25 in.) thick Ti-6Al-4V. Source: Ref 12.18 More
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Published: 01 January 2015
Fig. 12.15 Cross section of a good-quality friction stir weld in 6.35 mm (0.25 in.) thick Ti-6Al-4V. Source: Ref 12.18 More
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Published: 01 January 2015
Fig. 12.16 Cross section of a good-quality friction stir weld in 3 mm (0.125 in.) thick Ti-6Al-4V sheet. Source: Ref 12.18 More
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Published: 01 January 2015
Fig. 12.17 Surface appearance of a friction stir weld in 6.7 mm (0.25 in.) thick Ti-15V-3Al-3Cr-3Sn. Source: Ref 12.18 More
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Published: 01 November 2011
Fig. 6.21 Friction stir weld process development tool at the Marshall Space Flight Center shown with an 8.2 m (27 ft) diameter barrel segment of the 2195 Al-Li external tank for the Space Shuttle at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Michoud Assembly Facility in New More
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Published: 01 October 2012
Fig. 2.45 Friction stir weld process development tool at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) shown with an 8.2 m (27 ft) diameter barrel segment of the 2195 aluminum-lithium Space Shuttle. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Michoud Assembly Facility in New Orleans More