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friction coefficient

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Published: 30 April 2021
Fig. 3.15 The trend for friction coefficient measured for many metal-to-metal couples in the ASTM G98 galling test. The coefficient of friction reduces when gross plastic deformation of the rubbing surfaces takes place. More
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Published: 30 April 2021
Fig. 3.20 Friction coefficient trends observed over 30 years of laboratory testing of many different tribocouples More
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Published: 01 August 2012
Fig. 7.13 Evolution of friction coefficient, μ, with different tool temperature, maintaining punch at room temperature for 22MnB5. Sheet thickness t 0 = 1.75 mm (0.069 in.); austenitization temperature T γ = 950 °C (1740 °F); austenitization time t γ = 5 min; punch velocity V punch More
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Published: 01 August 2012
Fig. 7.14 Friction coefficient, μ, as function of blank temperature in contact area at die radius at moment of maximum drawing force for 22MnB5. Sheet thickness t 0 = 1.75 mm (0.069 in.); austenitization temperature T γ = 950 °C (1740 °F); austenitization time t γ = 5 min; punch More
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Published: 01 December 2003
Fig. 17 Specific wear rate and friction coefficient of unidirectional composites (see Table 4 ) in three orientations (pressure, 1.5 N/mm 2 ; velocity, 0.83 m/s; distance slid, 16 km) More
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Published: 01 August 2012
Fig. 7.11 Effect of temperature on mean friction coefficients under dry conditions. Source: Ref 7.10 More
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 30 April 2021
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.tpsfwea.t59300047
EISBN: 978-1-62708-323-2
... Abstract This chapter discusses the effect of friction in the context of design. It explains how friction coefficients are determined and how they are used to make sizing and selection decisions. It covers practical issues associated with rolling friction, the use of lubricants...
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Published: 01 June 2016
Fig. 7.12 (a) Coefficient of friction and (b) wear rate of Al5056 and Al5056-SiC coatings. Source: Ref 7.54 More
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Published: 30 April 2021
Fig. 3.2 The coefficient of friction of various web materials, thin materials that can be conveyed on rollers, versus a 4-in. diam. aluminum roller with a 0.5 μm roughness average (R a ) hardcoat finish. Test velocity was 0.1 m/s. Six replicates were conducted on a fresh surface of each More
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Published: 30 April 2021
Fig. 3.16 Correlation of sole rubber hardness with coefficient of friction versus prefinished oak flooring More
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Published: 30 April 2021
Fig. 3.18 Coefficient of friction of candidate bearing for a slow-moving linear slide that could tolerate no stick-slip behavior More
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Published: 30 April 2021
Fig. 6.2 Effect of normal force on the coefficient of friction of copper (Cu) in continuous unlubricated sliding on type 316 stainless steel (SS) More
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Published: 30 April 2021
Fig. 9.7 Coefficient of friction (μ k ) of various stainless steel couples wear tested in a thrust bearing type of contact. (e.g., Fig. 9.8 ) More
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Published: 30 April 2021
Fig. 10.5 Coefficient of friction of various ceramics in block-on-ring testing, where * indicates thermal spray coatings More
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Published: 30 April 2021
Fig. 10.10 Coefficient of friction of silicon carbide versus various metals in vacuum More
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Published: 30 April 2021
Fig. 10.22 Coefficient of friction (kinetic) of various cemented carbide couples in block-on-ring testing, where * indicates thermal spray coatings More
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Published: 30 April 2021
Fig. 11.8 Ranges of coefficient of friction for plastic versus steel tribosystems (from various plastics manufacturers’ catalogs). PTFE, polytetrafluoroethylene More
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Published: 30 April 2021
Fig. 11.9 Effect of normal force on the coefficient of friction (kinetic) of acetal versus 316 stainless steel More
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Published: 30 April 2021
Fig. 11.10 Static coefficient of friction of various plastics versus 52100 steel (60 HRC). PE, polyethylene; PTFE; polytetrafluoroethylene; PP, polypropylene; PBT, polybutylene terephthalate; PEEK, polyetheretherketone; PA, polyamide; PET, polyethylene terephthalate; PMMA More
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Published: 30 April 2021
Fig. 11.21 Breakaway coefficient of friction of 14 commercially manufactured shoes (soles) on prefinished oak flooring More