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fretting

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Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 August 1999
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.caaa.t67870085
EISBN: 978-1-62708-299-0
... Abstract This chapter explains how mechanical processes, including erosion, cavitation, impingement, and fretting, contribute to the effects of corrosion in aluminum alloys. It describes the two main types of erosion-corrosion and the factors involved in cavitation and liquid impingement...
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Published: 30 April 2021
Fig. 4.26 Schematic of fretting corrosion; fretting wear starts the same but reaction product does not form More
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Published: 01 January 2000
Fig. 41 Schematic of the fretting process. More
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Published: 01 January 2000
Fig. 42 Fretting corrosion of the bearing race of a helicopter drive train over-running clutch. This problem was caused by vibration (and rubbing) of the ball in the inner and outer races of bearings that support the rotor shaft. Note the two areas on the left- and right-hand sides More
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Published: 01 January 2000
Fig. 43 Fretting corrosion on the root surface of an aircraft power plant compressor blade. Fatigue cracks can initiate as a result of this fretting pitting damage. More
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Published: 01 June 2016
Fig. 9.3 Fretting damage on the hydraulic pump pad on an A357 cast aluminum transmission housing. Courtesy of the Applied Research Laboratory, The Pennsylvania State University More
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Published: 01 December 2015
Fig. 7 Fretting of cobalt-gold-plated copper flats in contact with solid gold in an electrical contact. (a) After 1000 cycles. (b) After 10 4 cycles. (c) After 10 5 cycles. (d) After 10 6 cycles. Source: Ref 8 More
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Published: 01 December 2015
Fig. 8 Local cold welding on the surface of 0.2% C steel after 500 fretting cycles. Courtesy of R.B. Waterhouse, University of Nottingham More
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Published: 01 December 2015
Fig. 9 Damage to Monel alloy after fretting in air at room temperature for (a) 1000 cycles and (b) 5 × 10 4 cycles. Courtesy of R.C. Bill, NASA Lewis Research Center More
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Published: 01 December 2015
Fig. 10 Effect of relative humidity on fretting damage to high-purity iron tested in air. (a) Dry air. (b) 10% relative humidity. (c) 35% relative humidity. (d) Saturated air. All specimens shown after 3 × 10 5 cycles. See also Fig. 11 . Courtesy of R.C. Bill, NASA Lewis Research Center More
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Published: 01 December 2015
Fig. 11 Effect of relative humidity on fretting damage to high-purity nickel. Damage produced after 3 × 10 5 cycles in (a) dry air and (b) saturated air. See also Fig. 10 . Courtesy of R.C. Bill, NASA Lewis Research Center More
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Published: 01 December 2015
Fig. 14 Comparison of fatigue life for 4130 steel under fretting and nonfretting conditions. Specimens were water quenched from 900 °C (1650 °F), tempered 1 h at 450 °C (840 °F), and tested in tension-tension fatigue. Normal stress was 48.3 MPa (7 ksi); slip amplitude was 30 to 40 μm. More
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Published: 01 December 2015
Fig. 15 Fretting scar on fatigued steel specimen showing location of fatigue crack (arrow). Source: Ref 18 More
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Published: 01 December 2015
Fig. 17 Section showing fretting damage and fatigue crack initiation in 0.2% C steel. Courtesy of R.B. Waterhouse, University of Nottingham More
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Published: 01 December 2015
Fig. 18 Section showing fretting damage and fatigue cracks in Al-6Zn-3Mg alloy. Courtesy of R.B. Waterhouse, University of Nottingham More
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Published: 01 December 2015
Fig. 19 Fretting fatigue failure of steel wire rope after seawater service. Wire diameter was 1.5 mm (0.06 in.). See also Fig. 20 . Courtesy of R.B. Waterhouse, University of Nottingham More
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Published: 01 December 2015
Fig. 20 Higher-magnification view of Fig. 19 showing fretting fatigue crack on the other side of the wear scar in Fig. 19 . Courtesy of R.B. Waterhouse, University of Nottingham More
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Published: 01 September 2008
Fig. 29 Fretting fatigue at the surface of a Cr-Mo-V steel More
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Published: 01 October 2011
Fig. 16.7 Fretting wear on a steel shaft where the interface with the hub was intended to be a press fit More
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Published: 30 November 2013
Fig. 13 Fretting wear on a steel shaft at the interface with the hub intended to be a press fit (~2.5×). The same fretting also appeared on the bore of the hub. This is typical of damage in a joint that is nominally stationary but in reality has slight movement between the hub and the shaft. More