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Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2008
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.tm.t52320013
EISBN: 978-1-62708-357-7
... Abstract This chapter describes the basics of energy and entropy and “free energy.” Fundamentals of internal energy U , the enthalpy H , entropy S , free energies G , and F of a substance are presented. The chapter also presents the thermal vibration model to promote a better...
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Published: 01 March 2012
Fig. 3.10 A combination of Fig. 3.8 and 3.9 : The molar free energy (free energy per mole of solution) for an ideal solution. Adapted from Ref 3.1 More
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Published: 01 March 2012
Fig. 3.19 (a) Molar free-energy curve for the α phase. (b) Molar free-energy curves for α and β. Adapted from Ref 3.1 More
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Published: 01 December 2008
Fig. 5.9 Free-energy and grain-boundary energy diagrams. (a) The parallel tangents law regarding grain-boundary segregation. (b) The relation of grain-boundary energy (σ A-X ) and grain-boundary segregation energy ( Δ E g b x ) More
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Published: 01 November 2010
Fig. 4.6 Standard Gibbs free energy of formation for several carbides as a function of (a) temperature and (b) solubility in nickel at 1250 °C (2280 °F). Source: Ref 21 More
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Published: 01 November 2007
Fig. 4.2 Standard free energy of formation for selected nitrides. Source: Ref 10 More
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Published: 01 July 2009
Fig. 5.1 Standard free energy of formation of oxides. Data for BeO from Table 5.2 ; data for other oxides from Kubaschewski and Evans [1951] More
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Published: 01 July 2009
Fig. 5.2 Standard free energy of formation of fluorides. Data for BeF 2 from Table 5.2 ; data for other fluorides from Kellogg [1951] and Kubaschewski and Evans [1951] More
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Published: 01 July 2009
Fig. 5.3 Standard free energy of formation of chlorides. Data for BeCl 2 from Table 5.2 ; data for other chlorides from Kellogg [1951] and Villa [1950] More
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Published: 01 March 2012
Fig. 2.12 Gibbs free-energy curves during solidification. Source: Ref 2.2 More
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Published: 01 March 2012
Fig. 2.14 Free-energy curves for homogeneous nucleation. Source: Ref 2.2 More
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Published: 01 March 2012
Fig. 3.1 Gibbs free energy for different atomic configurations in a system. Configuration A has the lowest free energy and therefore is the arrangement of stable equilibrium. Configuration B is in a state of metastable equilibrium. Adapted from Ref 3.1 More
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Published: 01 March 2012
Fig. 3.3 Variation of Gibbs free energy with temperature. Adapted from Ref 3.1 More
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Published: 01 March 2012
Fig. 3.4 Variation of enthalpy, H , and free energy, G , with temperature for the solid and liquid phases of a pure metal. L , latent heat of melting. T m, equilibrium melting temperature. Adapted from Ref 3.1 More
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Published: 01 March 2012
Fig. 3.6 Difference in free energy between liquid and solid close to the melting point. The curvature of G S and G L has been ignored. Adapted from Ref 3.1 More
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Published: 01 March 2012
Fig. 3.7 Free energy of mixing. Adapted from Ref 3.1 More
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Published: 01 March 2012
Fig. 3.8 Variation of G 1 (the free energy before mixing) with composition ( X A or X B ). Adapted from Ref 3.1 More
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Published: 01 March 2012
Fig. 3.9 Free energy of mixing for an ideal solution. Adapted from Ref 3.1 More
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Published: 01 March 2012
Fig. 3.11 The relationship between the free-energy curve for a solution and the chemical potentials of the components. Adapted from Ref 3.1 More
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Published: 01 March 2012
Fig. 3.16 The relationship between molar free energy and activity. Adapted from Ref 3.1 More