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fracture surfaces

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Published: 01 January 2015
Fig. 6.15 Fracture morphologies of fracture surfaces of 4340 steel CVN specimens heat treated as: (a) oil quenched and tempered at 200 °C (390 °F) and (b) isothermally transformed at 430 °C (810 °F). Source: Ref 6.16 More
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Published: 01 January 2015
Fig. 19.11 Percent of intergranular fracture on CVN specimen fracture surfaces as a function of tempering temperature for fully austenitized and quenched 52100 steel and 4340 steel. Shaded regions show fracture after tempering at temperatures usually used to produce high strength More
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Published: 01 October 2005
Fig. CH44.7 Fracture surfaces of some of the T-headed bolts. Gross features of fracture indicate shear loads. More
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Published: 01 March 2012
Fig. 15.39 Fracture morphologies of fracture surfaces of 4340 steel Charpy V-notch specimens heat treated as: (a) oil quenched and tempered at 200 °C (390 °F), and (b) isothermally transformed at 430 °C (810 °F). Source: Ref 15.24 as published in Ref 15.19 More
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Published: 01 August 2005
Fig. 2.26 Fracture markings on plexiglass. TEM, matching fracture surfaces. Note the matching features A , A ′ and B , B ′ on the two fracture faces. The parabola markings are similar to the plastic dimples observed in a tear ductile fracture of a metallic material. Source: Ref 2.14 More
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Published: 01 August 2018
Fig. 4.23 Illumination arrangement recommended for fracture surfaces and other nonplanar surfaces (arrangement E in the text). More
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Published: 01 September 2008
Fig. 4 Macrographs of primary fracture surfaces. (a) Strain bar, with maximum depth of fatigue at arrow (4.24 mm, or 0.167 in.), looking forward. Original magnification: 2.4×. (b) T-head, with maximum depth of fatigue at arrow (2.90 mm, or 0.114 in.), looking aft. Original magnification: 2.2× More
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Published: 01 September 2008
Fig. 6 SEM fractographs of the fracture surfaces of cracks 1 and 2 in the strain bar. (a) Fracture surface of crack 1, showing typical fatigue zones at arrows (750 μm). (b) Typical fatigue striations in crack 1 fatigue zones (30 μm). (c) Fracture surface at crack 2 of the strain bar, showing More
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Published: 01 September 2008
Fig. 18 Fracture surfaces. (a) Circumferential crack 1 (4.3 mm). (b) Circumferential crack 2 (4.3 mm). (c) Longitudinal crack (5 mm) More
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Published: 01 September 2008
Fig. 6 Fracture surfaces of SAE 4140 impact testpieces. Tested at room temperature, right, and at –196°C, left More
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Published: 01 September 2008
Fig. 33 Scanning electron micrographs of overload case fracture surfaces in carburized SAE 8620 steel. (a) Quenched directly after carburizing at 927 °C (1700 °F). (b) Reheated to 788 °C (1450 °F). Both specimens were tempered at 145 °C (300 °F). More
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Published: 01 August 2005
Fig. 20 Fracture surfaces of an aluminum alloy lug. Fractures originated by SCC on the surface of a diametrical hole, at A and B. The crack was then propagated by fatigue, as evidenced by the presence of beach marks at C More
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Published: 01 January 2017
Fig. 18.16 Sectioning allowed partial exposure of the fracture surfaces of the crack in Fig. 18.15 . Note the radial line pattern converging at the surface site of crack initiation just above the “3” on the ruler. Source: Ref 18.53 More
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Published: 01 March 2002
Fig. 7.29 Micrographs showing the fracture surfaces of the halves of a broken Charpy specimen mounted in epoxy. (a) Fracture surface plated with electroless nickel. (b) Fracture surface unplated. Note the excellent edge retention of the plated fracture surface. 2% nital etch. 500× More
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Published: 01 January 2015
Fig. 11.6 Ductile and brittle fracture surfaces. (a) Mixture of coarse and fine depressions or dimples characteristic of ductile fracture surfaces. Some flat cleavage facets are shown in bottom of micrograph. (b) Flat fracture surface facets characteristic of brittle cleavage fracture More
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Published: 01 January 2015
Fig. 21.20 Overload case fracture surfaces in carburized 8620 steel (a) quenched directly after carburizing at 927 °C (1700 °F) and (b) reheated to 788 °C (1450 °F). Both specimens tempered at 145 °C (300 °F). Scanning electron micrographs. Source: Ref 21.37 More
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Published: 01 September 2008
Fig. 44 Fracture surfaces of the jack pad showing location of the origins. Original magnification: 2× More
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Published: 01 November 2007
Fig. 16.7 Fracture surfaces of gray cast iron (3.5% C, 2% Si) revealed in SEM micrographs. (a) Type A (flake). Original magnification: 220×. (b) Type A (flake) at a dendrite. Original magnification: 600×. (c) Type D. Original magnification: 1000×. Source: Ref 16.4 More
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Published: 01 December 2009
Fig. 12.2 Schematic of fracture surfaces for an inherently ductile material with variation in fracture toughness and with variations in section thickness ( B ) or preexisting crack length ( a ). With an increase in either section thickness ( B ) or preexisting crack length ( a ), conditions More
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Published: 01 October 2005
Fig. 5.3 Perspective view of conjugate fracture surfaces. Source: Ref 11 More