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forms of corrosion

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Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2000
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.cub.t66910099
EISBN: 978-1-62708-250-1
... hydrogen embrittlement, hydrogen-induced blistering, high-temperature hydrogen attack, and hydride formation). All these forms are addressed in this chapter in the context of aqueous corrosion. For each form, a general description is provided along with information on the causes and the list of metals...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2015
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.cpi2.t55030003
EISBN: 978-1-62708-282-2
... Abstract This chapter provides an introduction to various forms of corrosion, namely uniform corrosion, localized corrosion, mechanically assisted degradation, environmentally induced cracking, microbiologically influenced corrosion, and metallurgically influenced corrosion. uniform...
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Published: 01 December 2015
Fig. 1 Different forms of corrosion and deterioration. SCC, stress-corrosion cracking. SSC, sulfide stress cracking. HIC, hydrogen-induced cracking. Source: Ref 16 More
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Published: 01 December 2015
Fig. 3 Schematic presentation of cross sections of several forms of corrosion attacks. (a) Uniform. (b) Nonuniform (localized). (c) Selective. (d) Intergranular. C, cathodic areas (M e ); A, anodic areas between the metal grains More
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Published: 01 December 2015
Fig. 4 Various forms of bacterial film that can influence corrosion. (a) Scatter of individual cells. 6050×. (b) Semicontinuous film of bacteria in slime. 3150×. (c) Bacterial cells in a colony. 2700× More
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Published: 01 December 2015
Fig. 15 The three most common forms of microbial corrosion. Source: Ref 40 More
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Published: 01 December 1989
Fig. 9.20. Three different forms of hot corrosion observed in Udimet 710 ( Ref 33 ). (a) Layer type. (b) Transition type. (c) Nonlayer type. More
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Published: 01 January 2000
Fig. 2 Schematics of the common forms of corrosion More
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Published: 01 January 2000
Fig. 3 Macroscopic versus microscopic forms of localized corrosion More
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Published: 01 June 2008
Fig. 18.5 Various forms of corrosion More
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Published: 01 March 2001
Fig. 3 Schematics of the common forms of corrosion More
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Published: 01 November 2012
Fig. 5 Various forms of corrosion. Source: Ref 3 More
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Published: 01 October 2011
Fig. 15.7 Forms of corrosion More
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Published: 30 April 2021
Fig. 9.4 Schematic of the “eight” forms of corrosion normally encountered by stainless steels. More
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Published: 01 July 2000
Fig. 1.3 Uniform corrosion with solid corrosion product deposit. Details of the formation of oxide species are not considered at this point. More
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Published: 01 December 2015
Fig. 1 Schematic presentation of corrosion metal cell formed by anodic (A) and cathodic (C) sites. The A sites (M e 2 ) have a more negative potential ( E ) relative to that of the C sites (M e 1 ). More
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Published: 01 January 2017
Fig. 18.21 Stress-corrosion cracking in cold-formed brass fuse caps. (a) Numerous longitudinal cracks are visible in the brass caps. (b) Unetched metallographic section showing the primary crack opening with limited branching. Original magnification: 50×. (c) Etched metallographic section More
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Published: 01 December 2018
Fig. 6.67 Rounded pit formed due to phosphate corrosion More
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Published: 01 December 2018
Fig. 6.117 Optical micrographs of outer surface showing hot corrosion in the form of grain boundary attack. Microstructure is essentially ferrite-pearlite with some surface decarburization, (a) and (b), 400× More
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Published: 01 January 2000
Fig. 8 Crevice corrosion at a metal-to-metal crevice site formed between components of type 304 stainless steel fastener in seawater More