1-20 of 372 Search Results for

fluxing

Sort by
Image
Published: 01 August 2005
Fig. 3.10 Wetting mechanism of self-fluxing filler metals. (a) Self-fluxing filler applied to copper component. (b) Filler and its oxide melt and wet the oxide film on the component surface. (c) Oxide film on the component dissolves in the molten braze to form a slag that floats to the free More
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 1988
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.eihdca.t65220241
EISBN: 978-1-62708-341-6
..., and techniques to apply heating to electrically nonconductive materials. These methods make use of devices such as flux concentrators, shields, and susceptors. The chapter provides a description of the materials for these devices and guidelines for their application. flux concentrators induction heating...
Image
Published: 01 April 2004
Fig. 3.6 Wetting of copper by Pb-63Sn solder using rosin flux. Soldering with flux generally benefits from a protective atmosphere (unless the atmosphere detrimentally affects the chemistry of the fluxing action), because the flux has to work less to protect the substrate and filler from More
Image
Published: 01 January 2017
Fig. 6.8 Diagram of homologous temperature vs. flux showing the regimes in which radiation-induced segregation is most pronounced More
Image
Published: 01 November 2011
Fig. 2.4 Gas shielded flux cored arc welding. Source: Ref 2.3 More
Image
Published: 01 November 2011
Fig. 2.5 Semiautomatic flux cored arc welding equipment. Source: Ref 2.3 More
Image
Published: 01 November 2011
Fig. 2.7 Effect of depth of flux layer on shape and penetration of submerged arc surface welds made at 800 A. (a) Flux layer too shallow, resulting in arc breakthrough (from loss of shielding), shallow penetration, and weld porosity or cracking. (b) Flux layer at correct depth for good weld More
Image
Published: 01 June 2007
Fig. 8.1 Flux density as a function of magnetic field. Source: Ref 1 More
Image
Published: 01 December 2015
Fig. 14 Magnetic flux leakage tool for detection and sizing of corrosion defects in a pipeline. Courtesy of PII More
Image
Published: 01 April 2013
Fig. 6 Effect of direction of magnetic field or flux flow on detectability of discontinuities having various orientations. See text for discussion. (a) Circular magnetization. (b) Longitudinal magnetization. Source: Ref 2 More
Image
Published: 01 April 2013
Fig. 3 Setup for the flux leakage inspection of welded steel tubing. Source: Ref 1 More
Image
Published: 01 April 2013
Fig. 18 Radiograph showing entrapped flux (dark areas) in a low carbon steel joint torch brazed with BAg-1 filler metal (light areas). 1├Ś. Source: Ref 1 More
Image
Published: 01 June 2008
Fig. 5.4 Flux of atoms across interface. Source: Ref 2 More
Image
Published: 01 August 2015
Fig. 2.3 Effect of hysteresis on heating rate. N: north; S: south; B: flux density in a ferromagnetic material; H: corresponding magnetic intensity. Source: Ref 5 More
Image
Published: 01 August 2015
Fig. 4.2 Flux plot of two parallel conductors carrying current in opposite directions. Source: Ref 2 More
Image
Published: 01 August 2015
Fig. 4.3 Example of transverse flux coil, with arrows showing direction of feed of the strip. Source: Ref 3 More
Image
Published: 01 August 2015
Fig. 4.35 Split-return coil. (a) Return offset. (b) Return in center, flux concentrator between turns, quench pads on the outside. Source: Ref 12 More
Image
Published: 01 August 2015
Fig. A3.6 The effect of using a flux concentrator on the heating of a shaft. Source: Ref 10 More
Image
Published: 01 August 2015
Fig. A3.8 Field distribution (a) without and (b) with a flux concentrator. Source: Ref 11 More
Image
Published: 01 December 2003
Fig. 3 Guarded three-terminal parallel-plate electrode system showing flux lines between electrodes. Source: Ref 5 More