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flaws

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Published: 01 January 2017
Fig. 14.4 Dynamic fatigue plot for a Z5U capacitor material. Flaws were introduced using a 5 N Vickers indenter. An N value of 67 was calculated from the slope of this plot. More
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Published: 01 November 2012
Fig. 7 Ten different types of flaws that may be found in rolled bars. (a) Inclusions. (b) Laminations from spatter (entrapped splashes) during the pouring. (c) Slivers. (d) Scabs are caused by splashing liquid metal in the mold. (e) Pits and blisters caused by gaseous pockets in the ingot. (f More
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Published: 01 April 2013
Fig. 2 Ten different types of flaws that may be found in rolled bars. See text for discussion. Source: Ref 1 More
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Published: 01 April 2013
Fig. 18 Coil assembly used for the simultaneous detection of flaws and of variation in composition, structure, and hardness in steel bars. Dimensions in inches. Source: Ref 1 More
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Published: 01 April 2013
Fig. 1 Typical flaws in resistance welded steel tubing, (a) contact marks (electrode burns), (b) hook cracks (upturned fiber flaws), (c) weld area crack, (d) pinhole, (e) stitching. Views (c), (d), and (e) are mating fracture surfaces of welds. Source: Ref 1 More
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Published: 01 April 2013
Fig. 4 Typical flaws in seamless tubing, (a) blister, (b) gouge, (c) lamination, (d) lap (arrow), (e) pit, (f) plug scores, (g) rolled-in slugs, (h) scab, (i) seam (arrow). Source: Ref 1 More
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Published: 01 April 2013
Fig. 4 Sections through two heat-resistant alloy ingots showing flaws that can impair forgeability. (a) Piece of unmelted consumable electrode (white spot near center). (b) Shelf (black line along edge) resulting from uneven solidification of the ingot. Source: Ref 1 More
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Published: 01 April 2013
Fig. 7 Schematic of flaws and their x-ray images. Defect types that can be detected by x-ray radiography are those that change the attenuation of the transmitted x-rays. Source: Ref 4 More
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Published: 01 April 2013
Fig. 14 Transducer scanning positions for distinguishing between weld metal flaws that are (a) vertically oriented and (b) in an inclined position. Source: Ref 1 More
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Published: 01 December 1989
Fig. 2.5. Stress-intensity data for some typical flaws. More
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Published: 01 November 2010
Fig. 17.33 Relative strength of adhesive and adherends as affected by bond flaws. Source: Ref 6 More
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Published: 01 August 2015
Fig. 9.4 Ten different types of flaws that may be found in rolled bars. See text for details. Source: Ref 3 More
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Published: 01 July 1997
Fig. 8 Electron-beam welds showing flaws that can occur in poor welds and the absence of flaws in a good weld with reinforcement More
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Published: 01 July 1997
Fig. 9 Plasma arc welds showing flaws that can occur in poor welds and the absence of flaws in good reinforced welds More
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Published: 01 July 1997
Fig. 12 Transducer scanning positions for distinguishing between weld metal flaws that are (a) vertically oriented and (b) in an inclined position More
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Published: 01 August 2005
Fig. 5.21 Propagation of surface flaw under uniform tension for initial flaw shape a /2 c = 0.3. Courtesy of T.M. Hsu More
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Published: 01 August 2005
Fig. 5.22 Propagation of surface flaw under uniform tension for initial flaw shape a /2 c = 0.5. Courtesy of T.M. Hsu More
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Published: 01 January 2017
Fig. 16.3 Flow chart for applying complementary flaw-height sizing techniques for intergranular stress-corrosion cracking (IGSCC). Source: Ref 16.11 More
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Published: 01 January 2017
Fig. 17.48 Relationship of applied stress and flaw depth to crack propagation in hydrogen gas. Dashed lines show an example of the use of such a chart for a steel with K th of 60.5  MPa m ( 55  ksi in . ) at an operating stress of 359 MPa (52 ksi). Source: Ref More
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Published: 01 July 2009
Fig. 17.32 Critical flaw depth of beryllium sheet calculated from fracture toughness data. Source: Pinto 1979b More