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flashing

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Published: 01 November 2019
Figure 41 Emission (bottom right) seen as a flashing light during movement of a resonator, indicating the position where two comb structures touch. From [83] . More
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Published: 01 June 1988
Fig. 11.21 Photograph of a getter flashing system used in production of television tubes Source: Lindberg Cycle-Dyne, Inc. More
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Published: 01 November 2010
Fig. 6.3 Sketch of the primary mount and flashing that must be trimmed to fit into a vacuum chuck and hand vise More
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Published: 30 November 2023
Fig. 10.17 Front knuckle casting; (a) parting plane and flash, (b) flash trimming die concept, (c) trim bead schematic More
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Published: 01 November 2013
Fig. 12 Closed-die forging with flash. (a) Schematic diagram with flash terminology. (b) Forging sequence in closed-die forging of connecting rods. Source: Ref 9 Definition In this process, a billet is formed (hot) in dies (usually with two halves) such that the flow of metal from More
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Published: 01 February 2005
Fig. 2.2 Closed-die forging with flash. (a) Schematic diagram with flash terminology. (b) Forging sequence in closed-die forging of connecting rods More
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Published: 01 February 2005
Fig. 14.11 Relationships among excess stock material, flash thickness, flash width/thickness ratio, and forging load for mechanical press forging of a round part approximately 3 in. (7.6 cm) in diameter by 3.5 in. (8.9 cm) high [ Vieregge, 1968 ] More
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Published: 01 February 2005
Fig. 14.13 Variations in flash-land-to-thickness ratio and in flash thickness, t, with weight, Q, of forgings of group 224 (materials: carbon and alloy steels) More
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Published: 01 November 2019
Figure 2 A two die stacked MCP package with SRAM on top of Flash configuration: (a) top view of the MCP package (b) cross-sectional view of the MCP package More
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Published: 01 November 2019
Figure 7 A Flash memory device was extracted from the FBGA package, and then wire-bonded into a new TSOP package. More
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Published: 01 November 2019
Figure 15 Package top view and SAM C-scan view showing four 2-dice stacking Flash memory in a L3A140 package More
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Published: 01 September 2008
Fig. 12 Micrographs of crack formation at flash edge More
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Published: 01 August 1999
Fig. 11.8 (Part 1) Electric-resistance flash butt weld. 0.1% C (0.12C-0.20Si-0.45Mn, wt%). (a) Weld region. 5% nital. 3×. (b) Weld region. Arrow indicates approximate position of the weld interface. 3% nital. 250×. (c) Fully austenitized zone immediately adjacent to weld. 3% nital. 250 More
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Published: 01 August 1999
Fig. 11.9 Electric-resistance flash butt weld regions, showing oxygen enrichment at the weld plane. 0.1% C (0.12C-0.20Si-0.45Mn, wt%). (a) Satisfactory weld. Alkaline chromate. 100×. (b) Satisfactory weld. Picral. A, 100×. B, 500×. (c) Defective weld. Alkaline chromate. 100×. (d) Defective More
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Published: 01 November 2013
Fig. 7 Section through a forging, die finisher impression showing flash clearance, flash land, and gutter. Source: Ref 7 More
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Published: 01 November 2013
Fig. 13 Closed-die forging without flash. Source: Ref 9 Definition In this process, a billet with carefully controlled volume is deformed (hot or cold) by a punch in order to fill a die cavity without any loss of material. The punch and the die may be made of one or several pieces More
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Published: 01 June 1983
Figure 4.16 Block diagram of apparatus for measuring thermal diffusivity by flash technique. More
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Published: 01 June 1983
Figure 4.17 Reduced temperature of rear surface of specimen in flash diffusivity method. More
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Published: 01 January 2015
Fig. 12.10 Transformer capacity as a function of weld area in flash welding titanium and other materials More
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Published: 01 January 2015
Fig. 12.11 Maximum machine upset pressure required as a function of weld area in flash welding. The upset pressure capacity required for titanium is much less than for stainless and high-strength, low-alloy steels. More